Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

Majority of European veterinary surgeons in the future will be female, survey finds
In 2018, female were being paid on average 12 per cent less than their male colleagues.

More than 14,500 professionals respond to FVE study


A recent survey carried out by the Federation of Veterinarians in Europe (FVE) has found that the majority of European veterinary surgeons in the future will be female.

The survey found that 58 per cent of veterinary surgeons in Europe are women and 42 per cent are men, representing a five per cent increase since 2015.

The FVE reports: “With the proportion of female veterinary surgeons being far higher amongst veterinary surgeons under the age of 40, it is expected that feminisation will continue further."

More than 14,500 veterinary surgeons responded to the second FVE Survey of the Veterinary Profession, conducted by the FVE between November 2018 and March 2019. Veterinary surgeons from 30 European countries were asked to complete an online survey to help understand the current situation of the profession and evaluate what actions should be taken to shape it.

Among its key findings, the survey notes there are now an estimated 309,144 veterinary surgeons in Europe, caring for 290 million companion animals and 371 million cattle sheep pigs and goats. Regarding its demographic composition, the veterinary profession in Europe continues to be a young industry, with 45 per cent of vets being less than 40 years old (in 2015 the proportion was 44 per cent). 

Despite women accounting for more than half of all veterinary surgeons in Europe, there remains a gender pay gap. The survey notes that in 2018, female were being paid on average 12 per cent less than their male colleagues (28 per cent in 2015). 


It also found that the vast majority of veterinary surgeons work full time (81 per cent), with the most common employment sector being clinical practice (58 per cent). The second most common sector is public service (14 per cent), followed by education and research (11 per cent) and industry (four per cent).


A full analysis by the FVE TaskForce can be found at www.fve.org

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Big Butterfly Count returns

News Story 1
 The world's biggest survey of butterflies is back for 2020!

Butterfly Conservation's Big Butterfly Count launches on Friday, 17 July and will run until Sunday 9 August. Members of the public can get involved by downloading the Big Butterfly Count App or recording results on a downloadable sheet available from bigbutterflycount.org/.

'It's a fantastic activity for people from three to 103 years and we'd encourage everyone to take 15 minutes in an appropriate outdoor space during sunny conditions to simply appreciate the nature around them and do their bit to help us understand butterfly populations,' said a Butterfly Conservation spokesperson. 

Click here for more...
News Shorts
New appointment at Dechra

Dechra Veterinary Products Ltd (Dechra) has announced a key appointment to support veterinary professionals across Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.

Karen Hockley has been appointed as a telesales account manager and will provide the latest products, news and developments from Dechra. She joins the company from a large mixed practice in Northern Ireland where she was the branch manager.

Before that, Karen had worked for a multinational veterinary pharmaceutical company as a key account manager for Northern Ireland. She can be contacted at karen.hockley@dechra.com or 087 219 54 30.