Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

Survey sheds light on global veterinary wellbeing
Delegates at the WSAVA World Congress were encouraged to take control of their wellbeing by supporting their colleagues.
Younger professionals, females and veterinary nurses ‘most seriously affected’

The first global survey of veterinary wellness has revealed that thousands of veterinary professionals across the world are experiencing stress and reduced wellbeing.

Conducted by the World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA), the survey suggests those ‘most seriously affected’ are younger professionals, females and veterinary nurses. It also highlights a reluctance among professionals in Asia and Africa to discuss mental health, an issue that described by the WSAVA as 'of significant concern’.

The results were presented by Dr Nienke Endenburg, co-chair of the WSAVA’s Professional Wellness Group (PWG), during the WSAVA World Congress in Toronto (17 July). During a subsequent panel discussion, delegates were encouraged to take control of their wellbeing by supporting their colleagues, making smart career choices and committing to ‘self-care’.

Dr Endenburg said: “Our research – the first global study of veterinary wellness – confirms a probable correlation between a career in veterinary medicine and an elevated risk of mental health issues. It’s likely that this is caused by a combination of factors including working environment, personal characteristics and client pressures.

“We are very concerned at the impact this is having on thousands of veterinary professionals worldwide and believe it must be addressed without delay.”

She continued: “The study has provided us with some very important data which we are now analyzing in more detail and preparing for scientific publication. We will then develop an urgent action plan.

“As part of the plan, we will share the helpful resources already created by some veterinary associations. We will also develop additional tools to ensure all veterinary healthcare team members can access help when they have – or ideally before they have – a mental health problem. 

“We hope our efforts will be another important step towards bringing about positive change and enhancing the well-being of all veterinarians globally.”

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Regional Representatives nominations sought

News Story 1
 Seven new regional representatives are being sought by the British Veterinary Association (BVA) to speak for vets from those regions and to represent their views to BVA Council.

The opportunities are available in in the North-East, Yorkshire & Humber, East Midlands, West Midlands, London, Wales, and Northern Ireland. Representatives from all sectors of the veterinary profession are urged to apply.

BVA president Daniella Dos Santos, said: "Our regional representatives are integral to that mission and to the activities of Council - contributing to effective horizon scanning on matters of veterinary policy and providing an informed steer to BVA’s Policy Committee.” 

Click here for more...
News Shorts
Livestock Antibody Hub receives funding boost

The Pirbright Institute has received US $5.5 million from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to form a Livestock Antibody Hub aimed at supporting animal and human health. The work will bring together researchers from across the UK utilise research outcomes in livestock disease and immunology.

Dr Doug Brown, chief executive of the British Society for Immunology, commented: “The UK is a world leader in veterinary immunology research, and this transformative investment from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation will drive the next chapter of innovation in developing new treatments and prevention options against livestock diseases".