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Rescue centre creates bunny ball pit to promote rabbit enrichment
Himalayan lionhead rabbit Princess enjoying the ball pit.

RSPCA Danaher offers plenty to entertain its smaller residents

An RSPCA rescue centre in Essex has come up with a novel way to keep its smaller residents entertained.

The Danaher Animal Home in Wethersfield is highlighting the importance of rabbit enrichment by showing off its bunny ball pit. Filled with dozens of colourful plastic balls, it’s already being enjoyed by Himalayan lionhead rabbit Princess, who has been in the care of the RSPCA since March.

And that’s not the only activity keeping the resident rabbits in good spirits. Animal centre manager Debs Satchell said that whether it’s cubes or tubes, cardboard boxes or shop-bought brain-stimulating puzzles, there is plenty to keep smaller animals entertained.

“We try to offer the smaller residents at Danaher plenty to keep their minds occupied and try to change the enrichments we provide them with regularly to avoid them becoming bored,” said Debs.

RSPCA’s rabbit and rodent welfare expert Dr Jane Tyson explained that rabbits are one of the UK’s most misunderstood pets who are all too often consigned to the end of the garden in a hutch alone.

“Whilst not all rabbits will enjoy being in a ball pit, for those that do, this can be great enrichment and owners can scatter some tasty, healthy treats in the pit for the rabbits to find,” she said.

“It is important they are never forced to enter a ball pit and are always able to escape. They should also always be supervised whilst in the ball pit to ensure they don't hurt themselves or start to nibble on the balls which could be dangerous.”

Image (C) RSPCA

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Special imports digital service set to change

News Story 1
 From Monday, 15 July, Special Import Certificate (SIC) applications will only be accepted via the Veterinary Medicines Directorate's (VMD's) new special imports digital service.

The original online special import scheme will be decommissioned. The VMD says that the new service is easier to use, more secure and reliable, and meets accessibility legislation.

The VMD is urging veterinary surgeons who have not yet signed up for the new service to do so before 15 July. The new digital service can be accessed here

Click here for more...
News Shorts
RCVS course explains concerns process

A free, online course from the RCVS Academy has been launched, designed to clarify RCVS' concerns procedure.

The content will give veterinary surgeons and veterinary nurses a better understanding of the process, and what they can expect if a concern is raised about them. It includes details of common concerns.

The interactive resource has been developed in collaboration with Clare Stringfellow, case manager in the RCVS Professional Conduct Team.

Ms Stringfellow said: "We appreciate that concerns can be very worrying, and we hope that, through this course, we can give vets and nurses a better understanding of the process and how to obtain additional support."

The course can be accessed via the RCVS Academy. Users are encouraged to record their learning for CPD.