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‘More research’ needed on CBD oil - BVA
BVA said there is a lack of robust evidence to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of CBD in pets.
Small pilot study suggests it can reduce epileptic seizures 

The British Veterinary Association has said more research is needed on the potential benefits and risks of cannabidiol (CBD) before proper regulation is brought in.

This follows a new pilot study by Colorado State University, which found that CBD oil could reduce the frequency of seizures in dogs with epilepsy, when given alongside conventional treatment.

The small study of 16 dogs assessed the short-term effect of CBD on seizure frequency. Nine dogs were treated with CBD for 12 weeks, while seven received a placebo. All dogs continued to receive standard anticonvulsant drugs, including phenobarbital and potassium bromide.

Of the dogs who received CBD, 89 per cent saw a reduction in the number of seizures they experienced. Researchers said there was a significant correlation between the degree of seizure reduction and the amount of CBD concentration in the dog’s blood. The findings have been published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association.

Responding to the study, BVA said there is a lack of robust evidence to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of CBD in pets.

Junior vice president Daniella Dos Santos said: “The use of cannabidiol (CBD) to treat pets is a live issue in the veterinary profession. While research is ongoing to look into its efficacy and risks, there is currently a lack of sufficient robust evidence to demonstrate health benefits and safety of CBD use in pets.
 
“The veterinary medicines regulator has stated that any products containing CBD must be regulated as a medicine, supported by scientific evidence and rigorously tested. At present no CBD-based products have been granted veterinary marketing authorisation in the UK.”

Pet owners who are concerned about their pet’s health should speak to their local vet for professional advice on safe and effective treatments, she added.

The Colorado team are now working on further research to determine whether a higher dosage could reduce seizures by more than 50 per cent. The study, which launched in January last year, aims to enrol 60 dogs. 

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Petplan Veterinary Awards 2020 open for nominations

News Story 1
 Nominations are open for the 2020 Petplan Veterinary Awards, a prestigious event that pays recognition to some of the UK’s most notable veterinary professionals.

“We have been recognising the brilliant work of the UK’s veterinary professionals through the Petplan Veterinary Awards for 21 years now and every year the standard of entries just gets higher,” said James Barnes, head of sales and partnerships at Petplan.

To nominate a colleague for the awards visit petplanvet.co.uk/vetawards, before nominations close on 16th January 2020. Winners will be announced at the awards ceremony on 2 April 2020 in Birmingham. 

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News Shorts
BEVA survey seeks views about antibiotic use in horses

Equine vets are being invited to participate in a BEVA survey that aims to find out more about antimicrobial resistance in equine veterinary practice.

Designed by researchers at the University of Liverpool and incoming BEVA president Tim Mair, the survey aims to fill gaps in knowledge about how antimicrobials are being used in equine practice and the landscape of resistant infections encountered in equine practice.

Researchers hope the results will lead to a greater understanding of the role of antimicrobial treatment and antimicrobial resistance in horses and protect antibiotics for the future of equine and human health.