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Staffies top the list of stolen pets
“Back gardens are commonly targeted by burglars so it’s essential to ensure gates and any access areas are locked and ideally monitored remotely."
Figures show nearly 2,000 pets reported stolen last year

Staffordshire bull terriers are the most commonly stolen pets, according to data acquired by the Dogs Trust through a freedom of information request.

Figures show nearly 2,000 dogs were reported stolen last year, over 1,000 of which were stolen from homes and gardens.

After Staffies, the most commonly stolen breeds were Chihuahuas, French bulldogs, Jack Russells and pugs.

The Dogs Trust is urging pet owners to check the access points to their homes and gardens, including looking for gaps in the fence and other property boundaries.

Microchips should also be kept up to date and dogs neutered to make them less likely to wander, and less desirable to thieves looking to breed from them.

Dogs Trust has teamed up with security company Yale UK, who will be offering advice to dog owners at some of the charity’s annual fun days.

Stephen Roberts, of Yale UK, commented: “Back gardens are commonly targeted by burglars so it’s essential to ensure gates and any access areas are locked and ideally monitored remotely. This helps to keep your garden secure, along with your beloved pets. Dogs are a member of the family, so it’s just as important to look after them, as it is to protect the house.”

Other steps that can be taken include keeping garden gates locked with a padlock and hasp, along with smart alarms and cameras as a deterrent. Indoor smart security cameras allow dog owners to keep an eye on pets via an app while they are away from the home.

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Pair of endangered Amur leopard cubs born at Colchester Zoo

News Story 1
 Keepers at Colchester Zoo are hailing the arrival of a pair of critically endangered Amur leopard cubs.

The cubs were born to first-time parents Esra and Crispin on the 9 September. This is the first time the Zoo has bred Amur leopard cubs on-site.

Amur leopards originate from the Russian Far East and north-east China. In the wild they are threatened by climate change, habitat loss, deforestation and the illegal wildlife trade.

The cubs are said to be “looking well” and are expected to emerge from their den in a few weeks.  

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News Shorts
BEVA survey seeks views about antibiotic use in horses

Equine vets are being invited to participate in a BEVA survey that aims to find out more about antimicrobial resistance in equine veterinary practice.

Designed by researchers at the University of Liverpool and incoming BEVA president Tim Mair, the survey aims to fill gaps in knowledge about how antimicrobials are being used in equine practice and the landscape of resistant infections encountered in equine practice.

Researchers hope the results will lead to a greater understanding of the role of antimicrobial treatment and antimicrobial resistance in horses and protect antibiotics for the future of equine and human health.