Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

Charity urges people to rehome rabbits
The Society said it looked after 373 rabbits in its centres during the first half of 2019.
Scottish SPCA reports huge rise in rabbits coming into its care

The Scottish SPCA is urging anyone thinking about getting a rabbit to consider rehoming one.

The call comes after figures released by the charity revealed a 40 per cent rise in the number of rabbits coming into its care. Writing on its website, the Society said it looked after 373 rabbits in its centres during the first half of 2019, compared to 268 in the same period last year.

The Scottish SPCA is highlighting the plight of the popular pet as part of Rabbit Awareness Week (1-9 June).

Sharon Comrie, animal rescue and rehoming superintendent, said: “Some rabbits arrive in our care in a terrible state having been denied basic nutrition and veterinary attention, while others are sadly forgotten pets children have grown tired of.

“The biggest issue is rabbits being put in a hutch and left at the bottom of the garden, with many enduring a life of solitude and boredom. Often the only interaction they have is a brief visit from their owner to bring food and water.

“Many owners even find this to be a chore and it is these rabbits which tend to be dumped outdoors or handed into one of our rescue centres.”

She continued: “While we never encourage taking on a pet on impulse we have many rabbits in our care looking for good, permanent homes. Anyone thinking of rehoming a rabbit should ensure they have the time, commitment and financial ability to provide a happy and healthy life.”

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Pair of endangered Amur leopard cubs born at Colchester Zoo

News Story 1
 Keepers at Colchester Zoo are hailing the arrival of a pair of critically endangered Amur leopard cubs.

The cubs were born to first-time parents Esra and Crispin on the 9 September. This is the first time the Zoo has bred Amur leopard cubs on-site.

Amur leopards originate from the Russian Far East and north-east China. In the wild they are threatened by climate change, habitat loss, deforestation and the illegal wildlife trade.

The cubs are said to be “looking well” and are expected to emerge from their den in a few weeks.  

Click here for more...
News Shorts
BEVA survey seeks views about antibiotic use in horses

Equine vets are being invited to participate in a BEVA survey that aims to find out more about antimicrobial resistance in equine veterinary practice.

Designed by researchers at the University of Liverpool and incoming BEVA president Tim Mair, the survey aims to fill gaps in knowledge about how antimicrobials are being used in equine practice and the landscape of resistant infections encountered in equine practice.

Researchers hope the results will lead to a greater understanding of the role of antimicrobial treatment and antimicrobial resistance in horses and protect antibiotics for the future of equine and human health.