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Dental disease ‘most common issue facing pet greyhounds’
Researchers also found that traumatic injuries, overgrown nails and osteoarthritis are major concerns for pet greyhounds.
Researchers study more than 5,000 greyhounds seen by first opinion practices

Dental disease is the most common issue facing pet greyhounds, according to a study by the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) and the University of Bristol.

The study, published in the journal Canine Genetics and Epidemiology, assessed 5,419 greyhounds seen by first opinion practices in 2016. Researchers found that 39 per cent of greyhounds suffered dental problems - far higher than has been reported for other large dog breeds.

Researchers also found that traumatic injuries, overgrown nails and osteoarthritis are major concerns for pet greyhounds. Overgrown nails affected 11.1 per cent of greyhounds in the study, wounds 6.2 per cent, osteoarthritis 4.6 per cent and claw injury 4.2 per cent.

An increasing number of greyhounds are being rehomed as pets after their racing careers finish. Researchers say their findings add significantly to the available evidence on the welfare issues surrounding greyhound racing.

They also believe their findings will help breeders and regulators prioritise activities to reduce the worst of the harm to greyhounds from their racing careers. The findings could also help greyhound rehoming organisations advise adopters on optimal preventative care options.

Lead author Dr Dan O’Neill of the RVC, said: “Pet greyhounds are now a common breed treated in general veterinary practices in the UK. Retired racing greyhounds can make very good pets, but these results sadly show that they also carry health legacies from inherent breed predispositions as well as impacts from their prior racing careers.”

Dr Nicola Rooney, co-author and lead researcher on Greyhound Welfare Project at the Bristol Veterinary School said “Greyhounds can make fantastic pets and live long healthy lives, but it has long been suspected that they are particularly prone to dental problems which can negatively impact upon their quality of life.

“Here we have the first evidence that levels of dental issues are higher in greyhounds than in other breeds. This highlights the importance of conducting research into ways of improving dental health.”

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Pair of endangered Amur leopard cubs born at Colchester Zoo

News Story 1
 Keepers at Colchester Zoo are hailing the arrival of a pair of critically endangered Amur leopard cubs.

The cubs were born to first-time parents Esra and Crispin on the 9 September. This is the first time the Zoo has bred Amur leopard cubs on-site.

Amur leopards originate from the Russian Far East and north-east China. In the wild they are threatened by climate change, habitat loss, deforestation and the illegal wildlife trade.

The cubs are said to be “looking well” and are expected to emerge from their den in a few weeks.  

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News Shorts
BEVA survey seeks views about antibiotic use in horses

Equine vets are being invited to participate in a BEVA survey that aims to find out more about antimicrobial resistance in equine veterinary practice.

Designed by researchers at the University of Liverpool and incoming BEVA president Tim Mair, the survey aims to fill gaps in knowledge about how antimicrobials are being used in equine practice and the landscape of resistant infections encountered in equine practice.

Researchers hope the results will lead to a greater understanding of the role of antimicrobial treatment and antimicrobial resistance in horses and protect antibiotics for the future of equine and human health.