Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

Study reveals new insights into dog tooth fractures
The most common fracture among all samples in the study was a crown fracture.
Research follows increased concern over chew toys

A new study has investigated the external forces required to fracture a dog’s teeth while chewing.

Published in Frontiers In Veterinary Science, the study comes amid growing concern about the role of chewing on treats and toys in the fracture of large cheek teeth.

Researchers took 24 maximally pre-molar teeth, extracted from dog cadavers, and potted them in cylinders filled with acrylic. The cylinders were placed angles of 60 degrees before the team carried out an axial compression test.

They found that the highest force prior to a tooth fracturing was 1,281 N at an angle of 59.7 degrees. The most common fracture among all samples in the study was a crown fracture, followed by an uncomplicated crown fracture, complicated crown-root fracture and and uncomplicated crown-root fracture, respectively.

The researchers found no significant associations between dog breed, age, weight, impact angle, crown height or diameter, and the maximum force applied to the fracture. Crown height to diameter ratio was the only variable that remained significantly associated with maximum force, suggesting that a decreased ratio can improve resistance to tooth fracture.

‘The mean maximum force sustained by the tested teeth prior to fracture was within the maximum chewing capability of the average dog,’ the researchers conclude. ‘Dogs routinely exposed to hard treats and toys that do not yield significantly below this point might be at increased risk of fracture of maxillary fourth premolar teeth as a result of overexertion during chewing.’

The study was conducted by the University of Pennsylvania in collaboration with Mars Petcare and North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine. 

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

RSPCA braced for ‘hectic hedgehog month’

News Story 1
 The RSPCA says that it is bracing itself for a ‘hectic hedgehog month’ after calls to the charity about the creatures peaked this time last year.

More than 10,000 calls about hedgehogs were made to the RSPCA’s national helpline in 2018, 1,867 of which were in July. This compares with just 133 calls received in February of the same year.

Evie Button, the RSPCA’s scientific officer, said: “July is our busiest month for hedgehogs. Not only do calls about hedgehogs peak, but so do admissions to our four wildlife centres as members of the public and our own officers bring in orphaned, sick or injured animals for treatment and rehabilitation.” 

Click here for more...
News Shorts
ASF traces found in seized meat at NI airport

More than 300kg of illegal meat and dairy products were seized at Northern Ireland’s airports in June, DAERA has revealed.

A sample of these were tested at the Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, resulting in the detection of African swine fever DNA fragments.

DAERA said that while the discovery does not pose a significant threat to Northern Ireland’s animal health status, it underlines the importance of controls placed on personal imports of meat and dairy products. Holidaymakers travelling overseas are being reminded not to bring any animal or plant products back home.