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Wild animals to be banned in circuses from 2020
The Wild Animals in Circuses Bill will mean circus operators in England can no longer use wild animals as part of a travelling circus.

Gove confirms new bill to be introduced in England 

Environment secretary Michael Gove has confirmed that the use of wild animals in travelling circuses will be banned in England from 2020.

The move follows a commitment in February last year to introduce a ban by the time existing interim licensing regulations expire. The government initially announced its intention to introduce a ban in 2012.

Mr Gove said: “Travelling circuses are no place for wild animals in the 21st century and I am pleased that this legislation will put an end to this practice for good.

“Today’s announcement follows other measures we have taken to strengthen our position as a world leader on animal protection. This includes our ban on ivory sales to protect elephants, and delivering Finn’s Law to strengthen the protection of service animals.”

The Wild Animals in Circuses Bill will mean circus operators in England can no longer use wild animals as part of a travelling circus. It brings England into line with other parts of the UK, including Scotland and Ireland, which have already banned the practice, while the Welsh Government has pledged to introduce a bill this year.

Welfare organisations and the British Veterinary Association have welcomed the news.

Simon Doherty, BVA president, said: “We are delighted to see this coming into law following a long and sustained campaign and a huge groundswell of public support. This is an outdated practice where the welfare needs of non-domesticated, wild animals cannot be met in terms of housing or expressing normal behaviour.

“While this issue may not affect a great number of individual animals, a ban is emblematic of how we should be treating animals in the modern world.”

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Do you know a practice wellbeing star?

News Story 1
 Has someone in your practice team gone above and beyond to make your workplace a positive one during the coronavirus pandemic? Then why not nominate them for a 2020 Practice Wellbeing Star!

The joint RCVS Mind Matters Initiative/SPVS Practice Wellbeing Star nominations recognise individuals who have held up morale during a time when practices are facing unprecedented staffing and financial issues.

Nominees receive a certificate in recognition of their colleagues' appreciation of their achievements and will be entered into the prize draw for a pair of tickets to attend the joint SPVS and Veterinary Management Group Congress in January 2021.

 

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News Shorts
WellVet reopens ticket sales to online conference platform

Following the success of its online conference, the organisers behind WellVet Weekend have re-opened ticket sales to allow new delegates to access session recordings and its online networking platform.

The day-long conference saw more than 360 veterinary professionals mix activity sessions with personal development CPD, all hosted within a virtual conference platform. Now, with more than 500 minutes of CPD available, the resource is being re-opened to allow full access to the session recordings until May 2021.

Sessions are aimed at providing delegates with a range of proactive wellbeing tools to explore to find ways of improving their mental and physical health. Tickets are limited in number and on sale at wellvet.co.uk until 30th August 2020.