Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

Wild animals to be banned in circuses from 2020
The Wild Animals in Circuses Bill will mean circus operators in England can no longer use wild animals as part of a travelling circus.

Gove confirms new bill to be introduced in England 

Environment secretary Michael Gove has confirmed that the use of wild animals in travelling circuses will be banned in England from 2020.

The move follows a commitment in February last year to introduce a ban by the time existing interim licensing regulations expire. The government initially announced its intention to introduce a ban in 2012.

Mr Gove said: “Travelling circuses are no place for wild animals in the 21st century and I am pleased that this legislation will put an end to this practice for good.

“Today’s announcement follows other measures we have taken to strengthen our position as a world leader on animal protection. This includes our ban on ivory sales to protect elephants, and delivering Finn’s Law to strengthen the protection of service animals.”

The Wild Animals in Circuses Bill will mean circus operators in England can no longer use wild animals as part of a travelling circus. It brings England into line with other parts of the UK, including Scotland and Ireland, which have already banned the practice, while the Welsh Government has pledged to introduce a bill this year.

Welfare organisations and the British Veterinary Association have welcomed the news.

Simon Doherty, BVA president, said: “We are delighted to see this coming into law following a long and sustained campaign and a huge groundswell of public support. This is an outdated practice where the welfare needs of non-domesticated, wild animals cannot be met in terms of housing or expressing normal behaviour.

“While this issue may not affect a great number of individual animals, a ban is emblematic of how we should be treating animals in the modern world.”

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Registrations open for overseas veterinary professionals course

News Story 1
 Registrations are now open for the RCVS CPD course for overseas veterinary professionals, which covers an introduction to the UK veterinary professions.

The course is aimed at overseas-qualified veterinary surgeons and nurses during their first two years of working in the UK, in addition to those considering working here. It provides graduates with the key information and skills required to practice in the UK, as well as helping them understand their legal duties as veterinary professionals.

For more information and to book your place please click here. The course will be held at Belgravia House, London, on Wednesday 12 June.  

Click here for more...
News Shorts
BVA launches award to celebrate young vets

A new award has been launched to celebrate inspirational young vets who are making a difference in their day to day work.

Nominations are now open for the BVA Young Vet of the Year Award, which is the first of its kind. It is open to all vets registered with the RCVS in the first eight years of their careers, working in any veterinary sphere, including clinical practice, research, education or veterinary politics. Organisers are looking for an ‘exceptional young vet’ whose work has benefitted the veterinary community or the workplace.

The awards are open for self-entry and nominations by 1 August 2019. The winner will be announced at London Vet Show on 14 November 2019, where a £1000 cash prize will be awarded, alongside a ‘career enhancing experience’ with Zoetis.