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Osteosarcoma study set to benefit dogs and children
“Comparative oncology - the study of cancer treatments in multiple species - has the potential to deliver tremendous medical advances" - Dr Timothy Fan.

Researchers to explore the combination of immunotherapy and radiation 

US researchers are conducting a study into whether a dog’s immune system could be stimulated to eliminate osteosarcoma.

The team at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine hope their findings could lead to advances in not only treating canine patients but children too.

Study co-investigator and veterinary oncologist Dr Timothy Fan said: “Because there are similarities between canine osteosarcoma and human paediatric osteosarcoma, finding better treatment options for this form of cancer is equally important.”

Osteosarcoma is a highly aggressive, malignant bone tumour that most often occurs in one of the limbs. The disease affects around 10,000 dogs each year in the US, most of which are large or giant breeds.

“The first sign owners typically notice in their pets is lameness,” says Dr Kim Selting who is also working on the study. “Animals may also have swelling in the area of the tumour. These areas can be warm and painful to the touch.”

Current treatment options for canine osteosarcoma are radiation, amputation, chemotherapy or a combination of these methods. The veterinary surgeon works with the owner to design a treatment plan, tailored to the individual, that focuses on quality of life.

In the study, the team will assess a treatment method that combines an immunostimulatory molecule called CPG ODN - a molecule that has already shown promise as a component of cancer vaccines - with high-precision radiation.

The study will take place in three parts, looking first at a cell model, then a mouse model to see how the CPG molecule works in real animals. The findings from these studies will then be used to develop treatments for a small pilot study involving dogs.

“Comparative oncology - the study of cancer treatments in multiple species - has the potential to deliver tremendous medical advances,” Dr Fan continues. “This field is exploding.

“The National Cancer Institute has designated Illinois and 21 other academic oncology programs as part of the Comparative Oncology Trials Consortium, which plays an important role in human cancer research.”

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Hill's Vet Nurse Awards 2020 - get your nominations in!

News Story 1
 Hill's Pet Nutrition are reminding all veterinary nurses and veterinary practices to submit their entries for its 'Pet Slimmer of the Year' competition, 'Managing Weight with Excellence Competition' and the 'Senior Support Nurse of the Year Competition'.

The deadline for the 'Senior Support Nurse of the Year' competition closes on 6 September 2020, while the other competitions will remain open until 14 September 2020. All finalists will have the chance to win up to 500 worth of Love to Shop Vouchers.

To see full terms & conditions or to enter the awards click here

Click here for more...
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Webinar highlights increasing threat of Angiostrongylus vasorum and other nematodes

CPD provider elearning.vet has launched a free webinar highlighting the increasing threat of Angiostrongylus vasorum and other nematodes to human and animal health. Hosted by parasitologist Dr Ian Wright, head of ESCAAP UK, the webinar also discusses the most effective treatment and prevention strategies.

Dr Wright said: "With surveys showing deworming frequencies below those recommended by ESCCAP and concerns surrounding over treatment of cats and dogs, there has never been a more important time to examine the importance of routine roundworm prevention. Without adequate control of Toxocara canis and Angiostronglyus vasorum, the impact on owners and their pets can be considerable."