Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

BBC programme explores benefits of independent practice
"I see the delivery of outstanding health care delivered by independent vets and I see them delivering that in a very affordable fashion". (Stock photo)

XLVets CEO says the future is bright for independents 

The chief executive of XLVets, Andrew Curwen, has said he is “very confident” about the future of independent veterinary practice, during a BBC programme on the changing landscape of veterinary ownership.

There are currently 1,800 veterinary practices in the UK, which comprise around 5,500 individual surgeries. Figures show that two years ago, about a third of these were corporate, but today, that proportion has risen to more than half.

Predictions suggest three quarters of practices could be taken over by corporates in another two years if the trend continues. However, Vet Record editor Adele Waters told the BBC You and Yours programme that the industry is seeing a “slow down” in acquisitions.

Mr Curwen commented: “The veterinary profession has historically been very adept at dealing with change. I see the delivery of outstanding health care delivered by independent vets and I see them delivering that in a very affordable fashion, without needing to be distracted by servicing the needs of third party shareholders, or people who have lent large amounts of money in buying the practice.

“So I’m very confident about the future of independent veterinary health care and I think it would be great for consumers to have the clarity as to who owns their practice now.”

Commenting on the benefits of independent practice, he added: “In independent practice the people making the decisions are the people who are working in the practice. They’re there day and, often, in the night. As owners of that business they’re there at the coalface of the operation.

“In large multinational organisations the people making the decisions may not be veterinary surgeons, they may not be in the same place at the same time. They may not even be in the same country necessarily as where those clinical activities are taking place.”

Adele Waters said the acquisition of practices has been “very competitive” and has been likened to a “feeding frenzy” with partners selling to the highest bidder.

She explained: “It takes years to get that money back. But I think now shareholders are concerned that it’s taking too long. And so now we are seeing a slow down in acquisition.

“I think independent practices are actually are feeling more buoyant than they were a year ago.”

Jacqui Garrett, chair of membership services at the Federation of Independent Veterinary Practices (FIVP), commented: “The independent practices we work with report benefits such as autonomy over decision-making, less focus on profit and the ability to offer a more bespoke service to clients, that is responsive to local conditions.

“In our members’ practices, ownership and decision-making is led by vets who work in the practice. Staff members also feel reassured by the stability offered by a practice that is ‘not for sale’.”

FIVP represents the interests of and promotes the values of independent practices, offering its members a range of benefits, in addition to acting as a voice for independents on key issues in the industry.

According to the BBC programme, a number of corporate organisations were invited to take part in the discussion, but declined.

 

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Huge spike in ‘designer’ dogs going into rescue

News Story 1
 The RSPCA has reported a huge spike in the number of ‘designer’ dogs arriving into its care.

Figures published by the charity show there has been a 517 per cent increase in the number of French bulldogs arriving into its kennels. During that time, the charity has also seen an increase in dachshunds, chihuahuas, and crossbreeds.

RSPCA dog welfare expert Lisa Hens said: “We know that the breeds of dog coming into our care often reflect the trends in dog ownership in the wider world and, at the moment, it doesn’t get more trendy than ‘designer’ dogs like French bulldogs and Dachshunds."

 

Click here for more...
News Shorts
AHDB Pork calls for stepped-up biosecurity

Pig farmers are being urged to step up biosecurity to reduce the risk of swine dysentery in their herds.

According to Farmers Weekly, AHDB Pork have confirmed cases in the north and east of the UK and is calling on producers to focus on hygiene to protect their animals.

Members of the AHDB Pork Significant diseases charter are reported to have been informed of the outbreaks.