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How to manage and resolve conflict
It is the leader's role to manage and resolve conflict.

Performance coach Katherine Eitel advises delegates at BSAVA Congress 

No one likes conflict, but it is the leader's role to manage and resolve it. Performance coach Katherine Eitel gave some excellent advice on how to do this in her lecture at BSAVA Congress in Birmingham (5-8 April).

She said before the leader/manager steps into a conflict conversation, they need to have decided what their role in the conflict has been and take on responsibility for this. They need to challenge their belief systems so that they behave in a truly neutral manner and handle the conversation from a positive place without negative thoughts.

When handling conflict conversations it is helpful to consider these four important words:

Gift - see conflict as a gift. Do not shy away from it, but see it as an opportunity to sort out a problem

Expectation - expect the conversation to go well and that at the very least you will learn from it

Choice - remember that everyone has a choice, but your standards are set in stone. If someone does choose not to follow them, perhaps they should choose a different job or role

Open - always remain open to the thought that your ideas are not necessarily the only right ones.

Katherine said there are a number of rules of engagement for conflict conversations.
There should be no 'talking backwards' - always move forward with issues.

No two people see the past equally, they will have their own versions of what might have occurred. It is important to accept this and move on to solutions rather than arguing.

Katherine also suggested using the following ARCH acronym:

A - agree to acknowledge any issues and find mutual goals
R - request a new agreement
C - clarify what has been agreed people do not always hear or understand what you think they do
H- always leave people with hope.

 

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Rare chimp birth announced at Edinburgh Zoo

News Story 1
 The Royal Zoological Society of Scotland (RZSS) welcomed the birth of a critically endangered western chimpanzee on Monday 3 February at Edinburgh Zoo's Budongo Trail.

The baby girl will be named in the coming days through a public vote, and staff will carry out a paternity test during its first health check to determine the father.

Mother Heleen's first infant, Velu, was born in 2014, making this new baby only the second chimpanzee born in Scotland for more than 20 years.

Budongo Trail team leader Donald Gow said: "While we celebrate every birth, this one is particularly special because our new arrival is a critically endangered Western chimpanzee, a rare subspecies of chimpanzee."

Image (c) RZSS/Donald Gow. 

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News Shorts
BEVA offering free membership to vet students

The British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA) is offering free membership to veterinary students. As part of a new initiative with the aim of encouraging more veterinary professionals into equine practice.

According to BEVA, less than one in ten veterinary students choose to work in equine practice. The association hopes that this initiative will provide insight into the field and the benefits of a career in equine medicine.

Benefits of membership include:
▪ access to a network of nearly 3,000 members
▪ special student rates to attend BEVA Congress
▪ online access to BEVA's Equine Veterinary Education (EVE) journal
▪ free access to the association's online learning platform
▪ free access to BEVA's practical veterinary apps
▪ exclusive discounts on a range of things from cinema tickets to grocery shopping.

BEVA will be releasing a series of short videos over the next few months from BEVA Council members, explaining what inspired them to work in equine practice.

Image (c) BEVA.