Your data on MRCVSonline
The nature of the services provided by Vision Media means that we might obtain certain information about you.
Please read our Data Protection and Privacy Policy for details.

In addition, (with your consent) some parts of our website may store a 'cookie' in your browser for the purposes of
functionality or performance monitoring.
Click here to manage your settings.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

Butterfly population grows in Scotland
The number of small coppers has almost halved since 1979.

New report shows increase in numbers since 1970s.

The number of butterflies in Scotland has increased by 35 per cent since 1979, a new report from NatureScot has revealed.

Despite annual fluctuations in population, often owing to weather conditions, nine species have significantly increased in numbers over the past four decades.

The biggest population growth was seen in red admirals, orange-tips and peacocks. The report suggests that climate change may have played a role, with a warmer climate allowing butterflies to move northward.

Despite the overall increase, three species significantly declined in number: small copper, grayling, and small tortoiseshell.

Small copper numbers have almost halved, with climate change and habitat loss potential causes. The amount of sheep’s sorrel, which is a main source of food for its larvae, has declined since the mid-20th century.

Simon Foster, trends and indicators analyst at NatureScot, said: “Butterfly populations can vary markedly from year to year depending on factors such as the weather and availability of food, but it’s reassuring to see that the overall long-term trend is improving.

“When we look at individual species, however, there are some that are clearly struggling, such as the small copper and grayling butterflies. Habitat and food loss appear to be major factors in their declines so we’re working hard to support them.

“Gardens are becoming an increasingly important habitat for butterflies like the small copper, and wildlife-friendly gardening could counteract a more general decline in urban butterflies.

"Urban green spaces are also vital habitats and projects such as the Central Scotland Green Network are helping connect areas for pollinators, including butterflies.”

Image © Shutterstock

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Bristol uni celebrates 75 years of teaching vets

News Story 1
 The University of Bristol's veterinary school is celebrating 75 years of educating veterinary students.

Since the first group of students were admitted in October 1949, the school has seen more than 5,000 veterinary students graduate.

Professor Jeremy Tavare, pro vice-chancellor and executive dean for the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, said: "I'm delighted to be celebrating Bristol Veterinary School's 75 years.

"Its excellence in teaching and research has resulted in greater understanding and some real-world changes benefiting the health and welfare of both animals and humans, which is testament to the school's remarkable staff, students and graduates." 

Click here for more...
News Shorts
RCVS HQ to temporarily relocate

The headquarters of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) is to move temporarily, ahead of its permanent relocation later in the year.

From Monday, 26 February 2024, RCVS' temporary headquarters will be at 2 Waterhouse Square, Holborn, London. This is within walking distance of its current rented offices at The Cursitor, Chancery Lane.

RCVS have been based at The Cursitor since February 2022, following the sale of its Westminster premises the previous March.

However, unforeseen circumstances relating to workspace rental company WeWork filing for bankruptcy means The Cursitor will no longer operate as a WeWork space. The new temporary location is still owned by WeWork.

RCVS anticipates that it will move into its permanent location at Hardwick Street, Clerkenwell, later on in the year.