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Dr Henry Lamb awarded BVA’s Young Vet of the Year
“To be named BVA Young Vet of the Year is a huge honour and it means all the more having heard about the outstanding work, dedication and skills of the other two finalists."- Dr Henry Lamb.
The award celebrates his work with mental health and in the poultry industry.

The British Veterinary Association (BVA) has presented Dr Henry Lamb, a poultry and gamebird veterinary surgeon, with its Young (BVA) Vet of the Year 2023 award.

This accolade celebrates Dr Lamb’s work tackling avian influenza, as well as promoting the poultry industry and supporting veterinary mental health.

The Norfolk-based veterinary surgeon began working for Crowshall Veterinary Services after graduating in 2018, where he provides consultancy and Official Veterinarian (OV) provision to the poultry and gamebird industry across Great Britain. He has also worked through bird flu outbreaks, held OV panels and prepared for the export changes prompted by Brexit.

Dr Lamb is a mental health first aider, and a trustee of the regional rural mental health charity You Are Not Alone. He is also a deputy rotation lead for RVC’s new poultry rotation and is the co-lead of his practice green group, through which he has supported his practice in receiving top Green accreditation for sustainability with Investors in the Environment.

Dr Henry Lamb said: “To be named BVA Young Vet of the Year is a huge honour and it means all the more having heard about the outstanding work, dedication and skills of the other two finalists.

“I’m delighted that after a challenging few years the poultry sector has been highlighted tonight, as all those involved have worked tirelessly to overcome the largest animal health outbreak the UK has experienced in recent times - I hope that winning this award will encourage more young vets to consider joining us in the poultry sector. It’s extremely rewarding work.”

The decision was made by a judging panel consisting of BVA president Anna Judson, Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) president Sue Paterson, national veterinary lead ruminant and equine at Zoetis UK Ally Ward, and previous award winner Hannah Hunt.

The award, which recognises young veterinary surgeons who contribute significantly to their work place or the wider veterinary community, received 140 nominations this year. The runners up were equine practice manager Camilla Church and charity worker Rebecca Hampson.

Dr Anna Judson said: “Henry’s dedication and hard work shines through in what is a particularly testing time for the poultry sector. His enthusiasm, not only for the work itself, but for encouraging and supporting other young vets and students to consider roles in the poultry sector, is inspirational.

“On behalf of all the judges, I wish Henry huge congratulations - he clearly has a bright future ahead.”

Image © British Veterinary Association

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Charities' XL bully neutering scheme closes

News Story 1
 A scheme that helped owners of XL bully dogs with the cost of neutering has closed to new applications due to high demand.

The scheme, run by the RSPCA, Blue Cross, and Battersea, has helped 1,800 dogs and their owners after XL bullies were banned under the Dangerous Dogs Act.

In England and Wales, owners of XL bully dogs which were over one year old on 31 January 2021 have until 30 June 2024 to get their dog neutered. If a dog was between seven months and 12 months old, it must be neutered by 31 December 2024. If it was under seven months old, owners have until 30 June 2025.

More information can be found on the Defra website. 

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News Shorts
Avian flu cattle outbreak spreads to tenth US state

Cattle in two dairy herds in Iowa have tested positive for highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), making it the tenth state in the USA to be affected by the ongoing outbreak of the disease in cattle.

Since March 2024, more than 80 herds across the USA have been affected by the virus and three dairy workers have tested positive. Authorities have introduced measures to limit the spread of the virus and farmers have been urged to strengthen their biosecurity protocols.

Mike Naig, Iowa secretary of agriculture, said: "Given the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza within dairy cattle in many other states, it is not a surprise that we would have a case given the size of our dairy industry in Iowa.

"While lactating dairy cattle appear to recover with supportive care, we know this destructive virus continues to be deadly for poultry."