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Lost echidna rediscovered in Indonesia
“Attenborough's long-beaked echidna has the spines of a hedgehog, the snout of an anteater, and the feet of a mole” – Dr James Kempton.
The species was last seen by scientists in 1961.

A species of echidna, named after Sir David Attenborough, has been seen by scientists for the first time in more than 60 years.

The rare egg-laying mammal was captured on film during a scientific expedition to the Cyclops Mountains in Indonesia’s Papua province.

The last recorded sighting of the species had been in 1961.

During the four-week expedition the research team, which included scientists from the University of Oxford, set more than 80 remote camera traps.

Although they discovered other species, including a honeyeater bird which had not been seen since 2008 and a new genus of tree-dwelling shrimp, it wasn’t until the final day that one of their cameras recorded the echidna.

The photographs are the first ever taken of the species, Zaglossus attenboroughi, which is classified as critically endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Dr James Kempton, who led the expedition, said: “Attenborough's long-beaked echidna has the spines of a hedgehog, the snout of an anteater, and the feet of a mole. Because of its hybrid appearance, it shares its name with a creature of Greek mythology that is half human, half serpent.

“The reason it appears so unlike other mammals is because it is a member of the monotremes – an egg-laying group that separated from the rest of the mammal tree-of-life about 200 million years ago.”

The species is not known to live outside the Cyclops Mountains. To reach the locations where they could find it, the scientists worked with Indonesian NGO Yayasan Pelayanan Papua Nenda to gain the support of the local community in the village of Yongsu Sapari.

Dr Kempton said: “The trust between us was the bedrock of our success because they shared with us the knowledge to navigate these treacherous mountains, and even allowed us to research on lands that have never before felt the tread of human feet.”

Image © Cyclops Expedition

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Charities' XL bully neutering scheme closes

News Story 1
 A scheme that helped owners of XL bully dogs with the cost of neutering has closed to new applications due to high demand.

The scheme, run by the RSPCA, Blue Cross, and Battersea, has helped 1,800 dogs and their owners after XL bullies were banned under the Dangerous Dogs Act.

In England and Wales, owners of XL bully dogs which were over one year old on 31 January 2021 have until 30 June 2024 to get their dog neutered. If a dog was between seven months and 12 months old, it must be neutered by 31 December 2024. If it was under seven months old, owners have until 30 June 2025.

More information can be found on the Defra website. 

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News Shorts
Avian flu cattle outbreak spreads to tenth US state

Cattle in two dairy herds in Iowa have tested positive for highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), making it the tenth state in the USA to be affected by the ongoing outbreak of the disease in cattle.

Since March 2024, more than 80 herds across the USA have been affected by the virus and three dairy workers have tested positive. Authorities have introduced measures to limit the spread of the virus and farmers have been urged to strengthen their biosecurity protocols.

Mike Naig, Iowa secretary of agriculture, said: "Given the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza within dairy cattle in many other states, it is not a surprise that we would have a case given the size of our dairy industry in Iowa.

"While lactating dairy cattle appear to recover with supportive care, we know this destructive virus continues to be deadly for poultry."