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WWII pigeon who saved aircrew honoured with statue
Winkie's actions helped save the lives of four RAF servicemen.
Winkie saved the lives of an aircrew stranded in the North Sea.

A new statue has been unveiled in Dundee to honour a carrier pigeon who saved the lives of four RAF servicemen in the Second World War.

Winkie helped rescuers locate the crew of a downed plane in the North Sea, for which she became one of the first recipients of the Dickin Medal.

The new bronze sculpture was unveiled on Thursday, 9 November, after a campaign by a local Cubs pack for the bird to be commemorated.

Winkie was on board an RAF bomber that was returning from a mission in Norway on 23 February 1942. Damaged by enemy fire, the plane crashed into the sea.

Like other British planes during the war, a carrier pigeon was kept on board to aid communication when radio could not be used. After the plane crashed, Winkie was sent out by the stranded crew.

Despite being covered in oil, and hampered by bad weather, she managed to fly more than 120 miles to return to her owner George Ross in the Broughty Ferry suburb of Dundee.

Ross alerted the RAF who were able to use information about weather conditions and Winkie’s flight to calculate the location of the downed plane and launch a rescue operation.

The four members of the crew were successfully rescued.

A year later, Winkie was awarded one of the first ever PDSA Dickin Medals, which had been created to honour animals serving in the armed forces.

Councillor Steven Rome said: “It is fitting that Dundee’s latest piece of public art commemorates a special Broughty Ferry heroine – Winkie the pigeon.

“The tale of her exploits has inspired new generations over the decades and I would like to thank the 49th Cubs for playing an important role in securing this statue.

“It will help to ensure that the story of Winkie will never be forgotten.

“I am also pleased that relatives of George Ross have been able to attend this poignant event to unveil the statue, which is fittingly close to Remembrance Sunday.”

Image © Dundee City Council

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Bristol uni celebrates 75 years of teaching vets

News Story 1
 The University of Bristol's veterinary school is celebrating 75 years of educating veterinary students.

Since the first group of students were admitted in October 1949, the school has seen more than 5,000 veterinary students graduate.

Professor Jeremy Tavare, pro vice-chancellor and executive dean for the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, said: "I'm delighted to be celebrating Bristol Veterinary School's 75 years.

"Its excellence in teaching and research has resulted in greater understanding and some real-world changes benefiting the health and welfare of both animals and humans, which is testament to the school's remarkable staff, students and graduates." 

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RCVS HQ to temporarily relocate

The headquarters of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) is to move temporarily, ahead of its permanent relocation later in the year.

From Monday, 26 February 2024, RCVS' temporary headquarters will be at 2 Waterhouse Square, Holborn, London. This is within walking distance of its current rented offices at The Cursitor, Chancery Lane.

RCVS have been based at The Cursitor since February 2022, following the sale of its Westminster premises the previous March.

However, unforeseen circumstances relating to workspace rental company WeWork filing for bankruptcy means The Cursitor will no longer operate as a WeWork space. The new temporary location is still owned by WeWork.

RCVS anticipates that it will move into its permanent location at Hardwick Street, Clerkenwell, later on in the year.