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NOAH publishes report on One Health opportunities
The report explores how the veterinary industry can support One Health and the UK's sustainability.

The new report recommends future steps for sustainability.

The National Office of Animal Health (NOAH) has published a new report, detailing how the animal health industry can support global One Health and sustainability.

Within the report, the trade association has produced recommendations of how organisations across the industry can contribute to the cause.

Among the recommendations in the report is a regulatory framework for veterinary medicines, which NOAH says would ensure safe medicines stay available and accessible for all animals. The association says that updated UK Veterinary Medicines Regulations would remove unnecessary burdens, and include novel and innovative products.

Furthermore, they have stated the importance that routes for veterinary medicines to market remain available. This would mean that animal owners can continue to access veterinary medicines, with necessary prescription controls.

NOAH has also pushed for better collaboration and partnership between human, animal and environmental sectors in finding sustainable One Health solutions to challenges that affect any sector.

Other recommendations made in NOAH’s report include training for farmers on disease prevention, increased awareness on responsible medicine use, assured funding for development of new medicines and improved diagnostics of diseases in animals.

The guidance has been created with a One Health approach, which suggests that animal, human and environmental health are interconnected and should be considered as a whole. NOAH believes that, by following their recommendations, the veterinary industry will contribute significantly to 10 out of 17 of the Sustainable Development Goals set by the United Nations in its 2030 agenda.

The organisation says that these steps will support the UK with reaching economic viability, holding environmental responsibility and protecting the health of society.

Dawn Howard, NOAH chief executive, said: “The animal health industry is dedicated to a One Health approach to identify and interpret problems, and to find and apply One Health solutions for a healthy balance across all three systems. Achieving this healthy balance is a key element in achieving a sustainable present and future for human and animal health and the health of the planet we share.

“We’re proud to put together this report which outlines examples of where the work of the animal health sector contributes to One Health, and the UK’s sustainability goals.”

The full report can be found here.

Image © NOAH

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Reporting service for dead wild birds updated

News Story 1
 The Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) has updated its online reporting service for dead wild birds.

The new version allows those reporting a dead bird to drop a pin on a map when reporting the location. It also includes a wider range of wild bird species groups to select from when describing the bird.

The online service, which helps APHA to monitor the spread of diseases such as avian influenza, can be accessed here

Click here for more...
News Shorts
NI chief vet urges bluetongue vigilance

Northern Ireland's chief veterinary officer (CVO) has urged farmers to be vigilant for signs of bluetongue, after the Animal and Plant Health Agency warned there was a very high probability of further cases in Great Britain.

There have been 126 confirmed cases of bluetongue virus serotype 3 in England since November 2023, with no cases reported in Northern Ireland. The movement of live ruminants from Great Britain to Northern Ireland is currently suspended.

According to the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA), the virus is most likely to enter Northern Ireland through infected animals or germplasm (semen or ova) being imported.

Brian Dooher, Northern Ireland's CVO, said: "Surveillance for this disease within Northern Ireland has been increased to assist with detection at the earliest opportunity which will facilitate more effective control measures."

Farmers should report any suspicions of the disease to their private veterinary practitioner, the DAERA Helpline on 0300 200 7840 or their local DAERA Direct Veterinary Office.