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NOAH publishes report on One Health opportunities
The report explores how the veterinary industry can support One Health and the UK's sustainability.

The new report recommends future steps for sustainability.

The National Office of Animal Health (NOAH) has published a new report, detailing how the animal health industry can support global One Health and sustainability.

Within the report, the trade association has produced recommendations of how organisations across the industry can contribute to the cause.

Among the recommendations in the report is a regulatory framework for veterinary medicines, which NOAH says would ensure safe medicines stay available and accessible for all animals. The association says that updated UK Veterinary Medicines Regulations would remove unnecessary burdens, and include novel and innovative products.

Furthermore, they have stated the importance that routes for veterinary medicines to market remain available. This would mean that animal owners can continue to access veterinary medicines, with necessary prescription controls.

NOAH has also pushed for better collaboration and partnership between human, animal and environmental sectors in finding sustainable One Health solutions to challenges that affect any sector.

Other recommendations made in NOAH’s report include training for farmers on disease prevention, increased awareness on responsible medicine use, assured funding for development of new medicines and improved diagnostics of diseases in animals.

The guidance has been created with a One Health approach, which suggests that animal, human and environmental health are interconnected and should be considered as a whole. NOAH believes that, by following their recommendations, the veterinary industry will contribute significantly to 10 out of 17 of the Sustainable Development Goals set by the United Nations in its 2030 agenda.

The organisation says that these steps will support the UK with reaching economic viability, holding environmental responsibility and protecting the health of society.

Dawn Howard, NOAH chief executive, said: “The animal health industry is dedicated to a One Health approach to identify and interpret problems, and to find and apply One Health solutions for a healthy balance across all three systems. Achieving this healthy balance is a key element in achieving a sustainable present and future for human and animal health and the health of the planet we share.

“We’re proud to put together this report which outlines examples of where the work of the animal health sector contributes to One Health, and the UK’s sustainability goals.”

The full report can be found here.

Image © NOAH

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Bristol uni celebrates 75 years of teaching vets

News Story 1
 The University of Bristol's veterinary school is celebrating 75 years of educating veterinary students.

Since the first group of students were admitted in October 1949, the school has seen more than 5,000 veterinary students graduate.

Professor Jeremy Tavare, pro vice-chancellor and executive dean for the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, said: "I'm delighted to be celebrating Bristol Veterinary School's 75 years.

"Its excellence in teaching and research has resulted in greater understanding and some real-world changes benefiting the health and welfare of both animals and humans, which is testament to the school's remarkable staff, students and graduates." 

Click here for more...
News Shorts
RCVS HQ to temporarily relocate

The headquarters of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) is to move temporarily, ahead of its permanent relocation later in the year.

From Monday, 26 February 2024, RCVS' temporary headquarters will be at 2 Waterhouse Square, Holborn, London. This is within walking distance of its current rented offices at The Cursitor, Chancery Lane.

RCVS have been based at The Cursitor since February 2022, following the sale of its Westminster premises the previous March.

However, unforeseen circumstances relating to workspace rental company WeWork filing for bankruptcy means The Cursitor will no longer operate as a WeWork space. The new temporary location is still owned by WeWork.

RCVS anticipates that it will move into its permanent location at Hardwick Street, Clerkenwell, later on in the year.