Your data on MRCVSonline
The nature of the services provided by Vision Media means that we might obtain certain information about you.
Please read our Data Protection and Privacy Policy for details.

In addition, (with your consent) some parts of our website may store a 'cookie' in your browser for the purposes of
functionality or performance monitoring.
Click here to manage your settings.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

Efforts underway to develop trypanosomiasis test
The parasite is an emerging serious threat in countries like South Africa, where more than 20 per cent of the global cattle population is farmed.
Common parasite infection causes three million cattle deaths annually. 

Scientists at the University of Edinburgh's Roslin Institute are seeking to develop a diagnostic test for the common parasite infection, trypanosomiasis – a disease that affects communities and livestock in some of the world's poorest regions.

Working with agri-tech firm Roslin Technologies, researchers aim to develop a test that could prevent infected animals from severe anaemia and wasting. Spread by the tsetse fly, the disease impacts milk and meat yields, causing an estimated three million cattle deaths every year.

Dr Finn Grey from the Roslin Institute said: “This parasite-borne disease is a serious concern for livestock and affected communities. Tackling it is a key step towards ensuring food security and supporting people in affected regions.”

Researchers say the test will be based on the detection of RNA, a small molecule of genetic material. RNA can also be used to differentiate between different trypanosome species.

The project will take 12 months, during which researchers will develop and validate the test, including assessing its sensitivity and ability to detect particular parasite species. It will then be handed over to Roslin Technologies for scale-up, kit development and preparation.

Professor Jacqui Matthews from Roslin Technologies, said: “We are very pleased to be working with the University of Edinburgh team to take this much-needed test to the next stage in its commercial development.”

Current trypanosomiasis tests can be ineffective in identifying animals with active infections. This can result in the over-use of anti-parasitic drugs, accelerating drug resistance among the parasites and make treatments less effective.

With no vaccine to protect against trypanosomiasis, control of the disease is centred on identifying and treating the affected animals. The parasite is an emerging serious threat in countries such as South America, where more than 20 per cent of the global cattle population is farmed.

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

World Bee Day celebrations begin

News Story 1
 Today (20 May) marks the fifth annual World Bee Day, which raises awareness of the importance of bees and pollinators to people and the planet. Observed on the anniversary of pioneering Slovenian beekeeper Anton Jana's birthday, this year's celebration is themed: 'Bee Engaged: Celebrating the diversity of bees and beekeeping systems'.

Organisations and people celebrating the day will raise awareness of the accelerated decline in pollinator diversity, and highlight the importance of sustainable beekeeping systems and a wide variety of bees. Slovenia, the initiator of World Bee Day, will be focusing on teaching young people about the significance of pollinators. 

Click here for more...
News Shorts
Further avian flu cases confirmed

Three cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 have been confirmed in recent days, bringing the total number of cases in England to 98.

On Thursday, the APHA confirmed two cases of HPAI H5N1 near Redgrave, Mid Suffolk and Market Weston, West Suffolk. A case H5N1 was also confirmed in poultry at a premises near Southwell, Newark and Sherwood, Nottinghamshire.

Protection and surveillance zones are in place around the affected premises. Further details are available at gov.uk