Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

British hedgehog classed as vulnerable to extinction
"It is not enough to rely on the goodwill of individuals to protect this important creature" - BHPS.
Government urged to enforce wildlife-friendly practices. 

The British hedgehog has been officially classed as vulnerable to extinction in the UK by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

According to a report by the Mammal Society, one-quarter of all British mammals are now on the brink of disappearing altogether, including the red squirrel, Eurasian beaver and the grey long-eared bat.

The British Hedgehog Preservation Society (BHPS) said the hedgehog's inclusion on the Red List for Britain's Mammals provides an opportunity to increase awareness of protecting hedgehog habitats, and to raise the importance of keeping these habitats connected.

The charity is calling on MPs to increase the protection offered to the hedgehog under the Wildlife and Countryside Act by moving it to schedule 5, allowing the level of protection appropriate for such a keystone species in decline.

“What people do on behalf of the hedgehog is amazing,” said Fay Vass, CEO of the BHPS. “The holes made in fences, the feeding, the hedgehog houses, the wildlife-friendly planting, the removal of hazards - all makes such a difference locally.

“But it is not enough to rely on the goodwill of individuals to protect this important creature. We need the Government to enforce wildlife-friendly practices. From farming to development to transport - wildlife needs to be taken seriously.”

The People's Trust for Endangered Species (PTES), which runs the Hedgehog Street Campaign in collaboration with the BHPS, also welcomed the opportunity to further protect these important creatures.

A PTES spokesperson said: “The IUCN’s backing reaffirms the importance of monitoring and the efforts of thousands of volunteers recording species that face an imminent threat of extinction. It is a stark reminder that the extinction crisis is happening not just in rainforests and tropical oceans, but in the countryside and waters of these shores.”

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Zoo calls for volunteers in its hour of need

News Story 1
 As ZSL London Zoo begins to get back on its feet, the organisation is putting out a call for volunteers who have time to help out. It comes after three months of unprecedented closure, which has seen zoos across the UK come under enormous financial pressure.

Volunteers will be required to commit to a minimum of half a day each fortnight, helping to assist zoo visitors as they make their way around. Volunteer manager Rhiannon Green said: "We need cheery, flexible people who can help visitors enjoy their day while respecting the measures that keep everyone safe.

For more information, visit zsl.org. Posts are available at both London and Whipsnade Zoos. 

Click here for more...
News Shorts
BSAVA webinars to shine the spotlight on selected journal papers

A free series of webinars that take a closer look at selected papers published in the Journal of Small Animal Practice has been produced by the BSAVA.

In the new BSAVA Science webinar series, authors of the featured papers discuss their results with a panel and how they may impact clinical practice. The authors then answer questions submitted by audience members.

The webinars are available via the BSAVA Webinar Library, covering four different papers. JSAP editor Nicola Di Girolamo, said: "Discussing the research with the authors - experts in their field - really helps to bring the papers to life."