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How to reduce face-to-face contact in veterinary practices
Alternative methods of communication can be used to carry out consultations and triage.

Social distancing for veterinary teams

Current government advice states that veterinary practices must reduce face to face contact immediately, in order to reduce transmission of COVID-19. This article covers several methods of introducing social distancing measures in practice, whilst continuing to provide veterinary care.

Alternative communication methods

Use of technology, such as video or telephone calls, can be used to carry out certain consultations remotely. This also offers an alternative mode of working from home for veterinary surgeons.

Additionally, web tools – such as online chat support – emails and text messages can be used to maintain effective communication. Clients can be asked to send photos of their pets using these platforms, to aid in examinations and triage.

Limiting footfall in practice

If a client needs to visit the practice, social distancing can be maintained by requesting that only one person accompanies an animal per appointment, as well as by asking clients to wait in their cars, allowing staff to bring animals into the building for examination.

Clients can also be asked to wait in the carpark to collect prescriptions. Or these could be posted to the client's home.

If you have any suggestions on how to further reduce face to face contact in veterinary practices, please email editor@mrcvs.co.uk

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Face covering rules expanded

News Story 1
 New rules came into force in England on Saturday (8 August) making it mandatory for clients to wear a face covering in veterinary practices.

The rules, which also apply to cinemas, museums and places of worship, follow a recent spike in coronavirus cases. All clients in England must now wear a face covering when inside a veterinary practice unless they are exempt for age, health or equality reasons. 

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News Shorts
BSAVA webinars to shine the spotlight on selected journal papers

A free series of webinars that take a closer look at selected papers published in the Journal of Small Animal Practice has been produced by the BSAVA.

In the new BSAVA Science webinar series, authors of the featured papers discuss their results with a panel and how they may impact clinical practice. The authors then answer questions submitted by audience members.

The webinars are available via the BSAVA Webinar Library, covering four different papers. JSAP editor Nicola Di Girolamo, said: "Discussing the research with the authors - experts in their field - really helps to bring the papers to life."