Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

New resource to help vets tackle illegal importation
The resource provides information on what veterinary surgeons should consider when a client brings their pet in for its first check-up.

Flowchart provides guidance on how to report suspected cases

A new resource to help veterinary surgeons identify and report pets they believe may have been imported illegally has been launched by the British Veterinary Association (BVA).


The resource - a compliance flowchart - provides information on what veterinary surgeons should consider when a client brings their pet in for its first check-up. It also provides guidance on navigating client confidentiality, how to report concerns of illegal imports and an overview of how local authorities are likely to respond.

It comes in response to a recent Voice of the Veterinary Profession Survey which found vets are finding it ‘difficult’ or ‘very difficult’ to report concerns to Trading Standards. Other concerns raised were a lack or proof or sufficient evidence to investigate, breaching client confidentiality and uncertainty about how to report suspicions.

BVA president Daniella Dos Santos said: “Veterinary teams can often be the first to suspect that an animal may have been illegally imported when an owner takes their pet for its first check-up. But our surveys have identified a compelling need for clearly defined routes and mechanisms for vets to more easily report suspected cases of illegal import.

“Our flow chart and supporting guidance aim to empower vets to report any such cases, thus helping to tackle the scourge of illegal importation and protecting animal welfare, both of the imported dogs and the larger canine population in the UK. I would encourage veterinary teams to put up the poster in their practices and use it to help report any suspicions to relevant authorities with ease.”

The resource has been launched in collaboration with the National Animal Health and Welfare Panel with support from Dogs Trust.

NAHWP contingency planning lead John Chaplin said: “Vets are often in the front line when it comes to identifying suspect illegal imports and the recent BVA survey has highlighted a lack of clarity on how any concerns can be reported. Local authorities are tasked with responding to potential breaches of the pet passport rules and work closely with the Animal and Plant Health Agency to quickly respond to all suspect cases.


“Dealing with a client whilst trying to understand the rules can be a difficult and complex process, however, the guidance and flowchart formulated in partnership with BVA will provide a useful tool to enable vets to quickly identify and report concerns.”

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Face covering rules expanded

News Story 1
 New rules came into force in England on Saturday (8 August) making it mandatory for clients to wear a face covering in veterinary practices.

The rules, which also apply to cinemas, museums and places of worship, follow a recent spike in coronavirus cases. All clients in England must now wear a face covering when inside a veterinary practice unless they are exempt for age, health or equality reasons. 

Click here for more...
News Shorts
BSAVA webinars to shine the spotlight on selected journal papers

A free series of webinars that take a closer look at selected papers published in the Journal of Small Animal Practice has been produced by the BSAVA.

In the new BSAVA Science webinar series, authors of the featured papers discuss their results with a panel and how they may impact clinical practice. The authors then answer questions submitted by audience members.

The webinars are available via the BSAVA Webinar Library, covering four different papers. JSAP editor Nicola Di Girolamo, said: "Discussing the research with the authors - experts in their field - really helps to bring the papers to life."