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Majority of European veterinary surgeons in the future will be female, survey finds
In 2018, female were being paid on average 12 per cent less than their male colleagues.

More than 14,500 professionals respond to FVE study


A recent survey carried out by the Federation of Veterinarians in Europe (FVE) has found that the majority of European veterinary surgeons in the future will be female.

The survey found that 58 per cent of veterinary surgeons in Europe are women and 42 per cent are men, representing a five per cent increase since 2015.

The FVE reports: “With the proportion of female veterinary surgeons being far higher amongst veterinary surgeons under the age of 40, it is expected that feminisation will continue further."

More than 14,500 veterinary surgeons responded to the second FVE Survey of the Veterinary Profession, conducted by the FVE between November 2018 and March 2019. Veterinary surgeons from 30 European countries were asked to complete an online survey to help understand the current situation of the profession and evaluate what actions should be taken to shape it.

Among its key findings, the survey notes there are now an estimated 309,144 veterinary surgeons in Europe, caring for 290 million companion animals and 371 million cattle sheep pigs and goats. Regarding its demographic composition, the veterinary profession in Europe continues to be a young industry, with 45 per cent of vets being less than 40 years old (in 2015 the proportion was 44 per cent). 

Despite women accounting for more than half of all veterinary surgeons in Europe, there remains a gender pay gap. The survey notes that in 2018, female were being paid on average 12 per cent less than their male colleagues (28 per cent in 2015). 


It also found that the vast majority of veterinary surgeons work full time (81 per cent), with the most common employment sector being clinical practice (58 per cent). The second most common sector is public service (14 per cent), followed by education and research (11 per cent) and industry (four per cent).


A full analysis by the FVE TaskForce can be found at www.fve.org

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Vets confirm further five cases of Alabama rot

News Story 1
 Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists has confirmed a further five cases of Cutaneous Renal Glomerular Vasculopathy, also known as Alabama rot.

The cases have been confirmed in Wallingford (Oxfordshire), Horsham (West Sussex), Hungerford (Berkshire - two dogs) and Malmesbury (Wiltshire). It brings the total number of confirmed cases to 198 since 2012. There have been 23 cases so far this year.

Signs that a dog has been affected by the disease include skin lesions on the lower limbs or mouth/tongue, leading to kidney failure. While investigations into the cause of the condition are ongoing, owners are being urged to wash their dog after wet or muddy walks.  

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WSAVA launches certificate programme focusing on companion animals in One Health

The first certificate programme focusing specifically on the role of companion animals in One Health has been launched by the One Health Committee (OHC) of the World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA).

The online programme, which is free of charge for WSAVA members, has been developed in recognition of the growing impact of companion animals in human society. Pet ownership is becoming more popular globally, and this has increased the implications for One Health, regarding the human-companion animal bond. The WSAVA OHC hopes that this course will bridge the knowledge gap between veterinary surgeons and human physicians. New modules are being added weekly, with a total of 20 modules expected to be available by early 2020.