Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

Edinburgh installs new veterinary linear accelerator
The new accelerator is equipped to deliver the most advanced forms of radiation therapy.

Advanced therapy offers new cancer treatment options

The University of Edinburgh’s Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies has announced the introduction of a new linear accelerator, placing it at the forefront of veterinary cancer treatment in Europe.


The new accelerator is designed to provide more targeted treatment, meaning that higher doses of radiation can be given less frequently. It also means that patients can have a shorter stay in hospital and receive fewer anaesthetics.


Offering the same cutting edge treatment options you will find in any human hospital, the accelerator is equipped to deliver the most advanced forms of radiation therapy. This includes static gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), dynamic gantry IMRT/RarpidArc, electron therapy and conventional 3D radiation therapy. 


It will be operated by a team including American and European boarded veterinary radiation oncologist Dr Magdalena Parys, European board certified oncologist Juan Carlos Serra, and therapeutic radiographer Emma McCormick. 


The University said in a press release: “IMRT is an advanced treatment technique, which allows the delivery of a precise dose of treatment to almost any tumour shape. In particular cases, this technique reduces the dose to normal structures, which decreases side effects in normal tissues which are close to the tumour. 


“Secondly, can IMRT allow an increased total dose of radiation to be delivered to the tumour. A common example is the use of IMRT to spare the eyes, brain, skin and oral cavity when treating nasal tumours. R(D)SVS is the only place in the UK to offer IMRT.”


The accelerator is also equipped with cone-beam CT imaging facilities, which enables the radiation oncologist to position the animal with greater accuracy so that treatment is safer and more effective. It is the only veterinary linear accelerator UK with this capability. 


The University added: "The new radiation unit will also soon be able to treat patients with stereotactic radiotherapy. This is a type of protocol that usually consists of one, two or three high-dose radiotherapy fractions, delivered with pin-point accuracy and in a short period of time. 


“By giving much more targeted treatment you can give high doses less frequently as you are mainly hitting the tumour cells, not the adjacent normal tissues. It also means a shorter stay in the hospital and less anaesthetics. This type of radiotherapy treatment modality has been successfully implemented in other places in the world for many tumour types, such as nasal and brain tumours.”

Image (C) University of Edinburgh.

 

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Celebrity chefs urge public to get baking to support Cats Protection fundraiser

News Story 1
 In support of Cats Protection's Pawsome Afternoon Tea fundraiser, Masterchef winner Tim Anderson and Great British Bake Off star Kim-Joy have shared biscuit recipes to help keen bakers raise money for needy cats across April.

The celebrity chefs are both cat owners and have said that they hope this fundraiser will help to raise awareness of cats in need and the importance of adopting a cat, rather than buying one.

This is the fourth year Cats Protection has run its Pawsome Afternoon Tea campaign, which encourages people to hold tea parties, bake sales and fundraising events to help raise money for the charity.

To view the recipes and other fundraising resources please visit the Cats Protection website. 

Click here for more...
News Shorts
BEVA offering free membership to vet students

The British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA) is offering free membership to veterinary students. As part of a new initiative with the aim of encouraging more veterinary professionals into equine practice.

According to BEVA, less than one in ten veterinary students choose to work in equine practice. The association hopes that this initiative will provide insight into the field and the benefits of a career in equine medicine.

Benefits of membership include:
▪ access to a network of nearly 3,000 members
▪ special student rates to attend BEVA Congress
▪ online access to BEVA's Equine Veterinary Education (EVE) journal
▪ free access to the association's online learning platform
▪ free access to BEVA's practical veterinary apps
▪ exclusive discounts on a range of things from cinema tickets to grocery shopping.

BEVA will be releasing a series of short videos over the next few months from BEVA Council members, explaining what inspired them to work in equine practice.

Image (c) BEVA.