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Loch Ness Monster may be an eel, study suggests
Some scientists believe that Nessie could be a Jurassic-age reptile or population of Jurassic-age reptiles such as a plesiosaur.


Researchers analyse DNA samples from water samples

Scientists investigating the myth of the Loch Ness Monster say that the repeated sightings could be attributed to a giant eel.


Researchers at the University of Otago, New Zealand, took DNA from 250 water samples in Loch Ness to reveal a comprehensive picture of all living species the loch contains.


Speaking at a media conference at the Loch Ness Centre in Drumnadrochit, Professor Neil Gemmell said his team had not discovered any monster DNA in the water. 


Some scientists believe that Nessie could be a Jurassic-age reptile or population of Jurassic-age reptiles such as a plesiosaur.


"We can't find any evidence of a creature that's remotely related to that in our environmental-DNA sequence data. So, sorry, I don't think the plesiosaur idea holds up based on the data that we have obtained,” he said.

The research team also looked for evidence to support other theories, such as various giant fish, catfish, eels or even a shark.

Professor Gemmel continued: "So there's no shark DNA in Loch Ness based on our sampling. There is also no catfish DNA in Loch Ness based on our sampling. We can't find any evidence of sturgeon either.”


The scientists did, however, obtain DNA evidence that the ‘monster’ could be linked to a giant eel. 


"There is a very significant amount of eel DNA. Eels are very plentiful in Loch Ness, with eel DNA found at pretty much every location sampled - there are a lot of them. So - are they giant eels? 


"Well, our data doesn't reveal their size, but the sheer quantity of the material says that we can't discount the possibility that there may be giant eels in Loch Ness. Therefore we can't discount the possibility that what people see and believe is the Loch Ness Monster might be a giant eel." 

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Pair of endangered Amur leopard cubs born at Colchester Zoo

News Story 1
 Keepers at Colchester Zoo are hailing the arrival of a pair of critically endangered Amur leopard cubs.

The cubs were born to first-time parents Esra and Crispin on the 9 September. This is the first time the Zoo has bred Amur leopard cubs on-site.

Amur leopards originate from the Russian Far East and north-east China. In the wild they are threatened by climate change, habitat loss, deforestation and the illegal wildlife trade.

The cubs are said to be “looking well” and are expected to emerge from their den in a few weeks.  

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RCVS names Professor John Innes as chair of Fellowship Board

Professor John Innes has been elected chair of the 2019 RCVS Fellowship Board, replacing Professor Nick Bacon who comes to the end of his three-year term.


Professor Innes will be responsible for making sure the Fellowship progresses towards fulfilling its strategic goals, determining its ongoing strategy and objectives, and reporting to the RCVS Advancement of the Professions Committee on developments within the Fellowship.