Your data on MRCVSonline
The nature of the services provided by Vision Media means that we might obtain certain information about you.
Please read our Data Protection and Privacy Policy for details.

In addition, (with your consent) some parts of our website may store a 'cookie' in your browser for the purposes of
functionality or performance monitoring.
Click here to manage your settings.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

Vets urged to be aware of the signs of animal abuse
‘Veterinarians must be alert to recognise signs of animal abuse' - Ira Roth.

Paper describes abuse case first diagnosed as Legg-Calve-Perthes disease

Veterinary professionals are being urged to be aware of the signs of animal abuse and to understand the link between human and animal abuse.

Writing in the Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association, vets from the University of Georgia’s College of Veterinary Medicine describe a case of animal abuse, which was first diagnosed as Legg-Calve-Perthes disease.

On initial presentation, a dog - a one-year-old male shitzu - was non-weight bearing in the right limb. An ophthalmic exam also revealed a corneal ulcer in the right eye and blood in the anterior chamber.

Radiographs of the right limb indicated avascular necrosis (AVN) on the right hip, with resilient fracture and possible AVN on the left side.

Twenty days later, the dog returned for evaluation of acute lameness in the left leg. Radiographs revealed a left display femur Salter-Harris type II fracture, a non-disposed healing right pubic fracture and a healing right zygomatic arch transverse fracture.

‘The dog's initial injuries were attributed to a routine fall at home, and radiographic interpretation suggested that this was plausible,’ writes author Ira Roth, a clinical assistant professor in the department of small animal medicine and surgery.

'Subsequent patient visits, evaluation of additional injuries, and interviews with the owner indicated that both animal and domestic abuse had occurred. Veterinarians must be alert to recognise signs of animal abuse and must be aware of the connection between animal and domestic abuse'.

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Vets asked to opt-in to Scottish SPCA fostering programme

News Story 1
 The Scottish SPCA is encouraging veterinary practices to opt into its new fostering programme, by agreeing to register foster animals when approached by one of the foster carers.

The programme goes live in August 2021, and will help to rehabilitate animals under the Scottish SPCA's care until they are able to be properly re-homed. The programme will help the animals to receive care and attention in a stable and happy home environment, as some animals do not cope with a rescue and re-homing centre environment as well as others.

Specific information for veterinary practices on the new programme can be found at www.scottishspca.org/veterinarysurgeons 

Click here for more...
News Shorts
Webinar provides insight into old age pets

A new webinar providing insights into the BSAVA PetSavers Old Age Pets citizen science project is now available free of charge to its members via the BSAVA Library

The webinar presents an exclusive insight into the research process and progression of the study, which aims to help veterinary professionals and owners provide the best care for their senior dogs.

It also discusses the study's research methods, the researchers' personal interests in this area of study, and how they envisage the findings being used to create a guidance tool to improve discussions between vets and owners about their ageing dogs.