Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

Study confirms value of Ridden-Horse-Ethogram for detecting pain
There was no significant difference between real-time scores and video-based scores for the experienced assessor.
Tool could help vets communicate more effectively with clients

Veterinary professionals that have been trained to use a Ridden-Horse-Ethogram are better able to identify pain-related behaviour in horses, according to new research.

It is hoped that the finding, published in Equine Veterinary Education, will allow vets to better communicate performance-related problems more efficiently with their clients.

In the study, researchers compared the real-time application of the Ridden-Horse-Ethogram with analysis of video recordings of the horses.

The videos were then analysed by a trained assessor and determined if vets, who had been trained, could apply the ethogram in real time in a consistent way and in agreement with an experienced assessor.

Researchers found there was no significant difference between real-time scores and video-based scores for the experienced assessor, confirming the reliability of the system.

“The study confirms that with basic training veterinary observers can use the ridden horse ethogram with consistency as an effective tool to help identify musculoskeletal pain which could reflect lameness or back or sacroiliac pain,” said study leader Dr Sue Dyson, head of clinical orthopaedics at the Animal Health Trust.

“The volunteers were unanimously positive about the potential value of the ethogram in helping them to determine the presence of musculoskeletal pain in horses performing poorly or at pre-purchase examinations.”

Dr Dyson and her team are now working with the US evidence-based online learning resource, Equiptopia, to produce a training video to enable vets, owners, riders and trainers to learn how to apply to Ridden-Horse-Ethogram. To find out more email info@equitopiacenter.com

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Face covering rules expanded

News Story 1
 New rules came into force in England on Saturday (8 August) making it mandatory for clients to wear a face covering in veterinary practices.

The rules, which also apply to cinemas, museums and places of worship, follow a recent spike in coronavirus cases. All clients in England must now wear a face covering when inside a veterinary practice unless they are exempt for age, health or equality reasons. 

Click here for more...
News Shorts
BSAVA webinars to shine the spotlight on selected journal papers

A free series of webinars that take a closer look at selected papers published in the Journal of Small Animal Practice has been produced by the BSAVA.

In the new BSAVA Science webinar series, authors of the featured papers discuss their results with a panel and how they may impact clinical practice. The authors then answer questions submitted by audience members.

The webinars are available via the BSAVA Webinar Library, covering four different papers. JSAP editor Nicola Di Girolamo, said: "Discussing the research with the authors - experts in their field - really helps to bring the papers to life."