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Government invites discussion on rehoming banned breeds
Current legislation makes it illegal to own four types of dog in the UK, including the pit bull terrier.
Minister to discuss options with charities and MPs

Animal welfare minister David Rutley has indicated that the government is prepared to explore options for allowing banned dog breeds to be rehomed.

The issue was debated in parliament last week, after the government responded to 16 recommendations made by the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Efra) Committee.

Cross-party MPs and animal welfare charities have called for a change in the law to allow banned breeds to be rehomed, if they are judged to have a good temperament.

Current legislation makes it illegal to own four types of dog in the UK, including the pit bull terrier. An exemption certificate can be sought from the courts but exempt dogs cannot be rehomed unless the owner dies. As a result, if the dog strays or the owner abandons or can no longer care for it, rescue charities are left with no choice but to euthanise it.

Mr Rutley described the rehoming of pit bulls as an “emotive and difficult issue”. Currently the law does not allow stray pit bulls to be placed with an owner they have never met before the court case. However, he said the government will “continue to discuss with stakeholders what can be done” and invited Efra chair Neil Parish to meet with him and relevant welfare groups for further discussion.

He went on to say that there are opportunities for some dogs to be rehomed, for example if an owner moved and abandoned a dog, but another person had got to know the dog before the move, that person could apply to be the person in change of the dog, if they were considered fit and proper by the court.

However, Mr Rutley made it clear that the government is not recommending a change in the law, which would require primary legislation.

Responding to Mr Rutley’s comments, Mr Parish said: “Blue Cross, Dogs Trust, Battersea dogs home and the RSPCA need to be confident that there is a system that allows them legally to rehome that dog. That is why I look forward to meeting the Minister and officials to try to get a legal basis for that…

“There is a lot of work to be done, because we do not want more postal workers to be attacked or for the number of dog bites to keep going up as they have… The Select Committee, the Opposition and the Government can make the law work much better, and I hope that fewer dogs of good temperament will be put down in future.”

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Laura Muir wins gold at Commonwealth Games

News Story 1
 Veterinary surgeon and Olympic silver-medalist Laura Muir scooped the gold medal in the 1500m final Commonwealth Games on Sunday.

Winning Scotland's 12th title of the games, Muir finished in four minutes 2.75 seconds, collecting her second medal in 24 hours.

Dr Muir commented on her win: "I just thought my strength is in my kick and I just tried to trust it and hope nobody would catch me. I ran as hard as I could to the line.

"It is so nice to come here and not just get one medal but two and in such a competitive field. Those girls are fast. It means a lot." 

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Views sought on NOAH Compendium

Users of the National Office of Animal Health (NOAH) Compendium app and website are being asked to share their views on how it can be improved.

In a new survey, users are asked about some suggested future developments, such as notifications for new and updated datasheets, sharing links to datasheets, and enhanced search functionality.

It comes after NOAH ceased publication of the NOAH Compendium book as part of its sustainability and environmental commitments. The website and the app will now be the main routes to access datasheets and view any changes.