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Study shows high prevalence of gait abnormality in pugs
Out of the 550 pugs assessed, gait abnormalities were reported in 30.7 per cent of responses.
Abnormality may be linked to neurological issues

More than 30 per cent of pugs suffer from gait abnormality, according to new research.

A study published in Veterinary Record assessed 550 pugs registered by the Swedish Kennel Club. The dogs were all one, five and eight years of age.

Researchers sent an online questionnaire to the owners of the pugs, asking them to answer questions about the nature of their dog’s gait. The owners were also encouraged to send video footage of their pug, showing their dog walking back to forth, on the leash and walking from the side.

Researchers found that out of the 550 pugs assessed, gait abnormalities were reported in 30.7 per cent of responses. The most common sign of pain described by the owners was a reluctance to go for walks (56.7 per cent).

The researchers also found a link between abnormal gait and age, with gait abnormalities being more prevalent in older pugs. An association between abnormal gait and dyspnoea was also found, with dyspnoea being significantly more common in pugs with gait abnormalities.

The researchers said that whilst abnormal gait could be the result of orthopaedic conditions, it may also be a consequence of neurological issues.

“Although this study did not aim to differentiate orthopaedic from neurological causes for gait abnormalities, the high prevalence of wearing of nails reported in the questionnaires, and the fact that lameness was not a common finding in submitted videos, suggest that the majority of gait abnormalities in the pugs were indeed related to neurological rather than orthopaedic disorders,” the authors write.

The authors conclude that the prevalence of gait abnormalities was high and increased with age. This suggests that gait abnormalities are a more significant health problem in pugs than previously reported.

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Bristol uni celebrates 75 years of teaching vets

News Story 1
 The University of Bristol's veterinary school is celebrating 75 years of educating veterinary students.

Since the first group of students were admitted in October 1949, the school has seen more than 5,000 veterinary students graduate.

Professor Jeremy Tavare, pro vice-chancellor and executive dean for the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, said: "I'm delighted to be celebrating Bristol Veterinary School's 75 years.

"Its excellence in teaching and research has resulted in greater understanding and some real-world changes benefiting the health and welfare of both animals and humans, which is testament to the school's remarkable staff, students and graduates." 

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Second edition of BSAVA's Thoracic Imaging manual released

The British Small Animal Veterinary Association (BSAVA) has released the second edition of the BSAVA Manual of Canine and Feline Thoracic Imaging.

This edition provides new knowledge, gathered from CTs and MRIs, some of which can be applied to radiographic interpretation.

The first section explores different imaging modalities for thoracic imaging, including recommended uses. The second section illustrates features of normalcy and disease in the main anatomic compartment of the thorax.

This includes structured information about thoracic imaging interpretation and individual body systems.

There is also a new chapter exploring how artificial intelligence could be applied to the practice.

Tobias Schwarz and Peter Scrivani, who edited the book, said: "We are grateful to the many radiologists and other specialists from around the world who contributed to this manual by writing chapters, supplying images, and providing feedback.

"Our aim was to ensure that the manual was as up-to-date, accurate and comprehensive as possible."

Print copies can be purchased in the BSAVA store, with a digital version in the BSAVA library.