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RVC issues warning over microchip case
microchip in dog's brain
An exemption certificate can be provided in cases where, in the vet's professional opinion, microchipping could adversely affect the health of the dog.

Vets highlight potential complications of microchipping small dogs
 
Small animal neurologists at the RVC's Queen Mother Hospital for Animals are highlighting the potential complications associated with microchipping very small dogs, following a recent case.

A seven-week-old female Chihuahua, weighing just 750g, was referred to the hospital after a microchip was accidentally placed through the caudal aspect of the skull, into the rostral brainstem. Due to the chip's location, the decision was made to leave it in place.

The puppy initially showed marked neurological dysfunction as a result of traumatic brain injury, but since then a remarkable improvement has been observed and vets say there is no apparent compromise to the animal's welfare.

The microchip was placed by an implanter, trained and approved under section nine of the Microchipping of Dogs (England) Regulations 2015. The regulations, which came into force in April of this year, make it a legal requirement for all dogs to be microchipped by the age of eight weeks.

Writing in Vet Record, neurologists said they wanted to raise awareness of the certificate of exemption, which is available from Defra. The certificate can be provided by a veterinary surgeon in cases where, in their professional opinion, microchipping could adversely affect the health of the dog.

They advised implanters to seek the advice of a veterinary surgeon if they are unsure about the suitability of a dog for microchip implantation.

Image © RVC

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Laura Muir wins gold at Commonwealth Games

News Story 1
 Veterinary surgeon and Olympic silver-medalist Laura Muir scooped the gold medal in the 1500m final Commonwealth Games on Sunday.

Winning Scotland's 12th title of the games, Muir finished in four minutes 2.75 seconds, collecting her second medal in 24 hours.

Dr Muir commented on her win: "I just thought my strength is in my kick and I just tried to trust it and hope nobody would catch me. I ran as hard as I could to the line.

"It is so nice to come here and not just get one medal but two and in such a competitive field. Those girls are fast. It means a lot." 

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News Shorts
Views sought on NOAH Compendium

Users of the National Office of Animal Health (NOAH) Compendium app and website are being asked to share their views on how it can be improved.

In a new survey, users are asked about some suggested future developments, such as notifications for new and updated datasheets, sharing links to datasheets, and enhanced search functionality.

It comes after NOAH ceased publication of the NOAH Compendium book as part of its sustainability and environmental commitments. The website and the app will now be the main routes to access datasheets and view any changes.