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RVC issues warning over microchip case
microchip in dog's brain
An exemption certificate can be provided in cases where, in the vet's professional opinion, microchipping could adversely affect the health of the dog.

Vets highlight potential complications of microchipping small dogs
 
Small animal neurologists at the RVC's Queen Mother Hospital for Animals are highlighting the potential complications associated with microchipping very small dogs, following a recent case.

A seven-week-old female Chihuahua, weighing just 750g, was referred to the hospital after a microchip was accidentally placed through the caudal aspect of the skull, into the rostral brainstem. Due to the chip's location, the decision was made to leave it in place.

The puppy initially showed marked neurological dysfunction as a result of traumatic brain injury, but since then a remarkable improvement has been observed and vets say there is no apparent compromise to the animal's welfare.

The microchip was placed by an implanter, trained and approved under section nine of the Microchipping of Dogs (England) Regulations 2015. The regulations, which came into force in April of this year, make it a legal requirement for all dogs to be microchipped by the age of eight weeks.

Writing in Vet Record, neurologists said they wanted to raise awareness of the certificate of exemption, which is available from Defra. The certificate can be provided by a veterinary surgeon in cases where, in their professional opinion, microchipping could adversely affect the health of the dog.

They advised implanters to seek the advice of a veterinary surgeon if they are unsure about the suitability of a dog for microchip implantation.

Image © RVC

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Budding 'Dr Dolittles' sought for writing competition

News Story 1
 Vets are being invited to enter a writing competition run by the Page Turner Awards for a chance to get their story published or even made into a film.

Dubbed the 'Rolls Royce' of writing awards, the Page Turner competition provides an opportunity for aspiring writers to submit unpublished fiction and non-fiction work to be read by a panel of influential players in the publishing industry.

A spokesperson said: 'Do you think of yourself as a magical healer, like Dr Dolittle. Or maybe you have a story to share about the times when, sadly, animals can't be treated, and pet owners reflect on those moments they took for granted."

For more information, visit pageturnerawards.com 

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News Shorts
Avian influenza confirmed in Lancashire

A case of highly pathogenic (HPAI H5N8) avian influenza has been confirmed in two captive peregrine falcons on a non-commercial, non-poultry premises near Skelmersdale, West Lancashire.

Following a risk assessment, APHA has declared that no disease control zones have been put in place surrounding this non-commercial, non-poultry premises.

Eighteen cases of HPAI H5N8 have now been identified in poultry and other captive birds in England. A housing order for poultry and captive birds introduced by Defra to control the spread of the disease expired on 31 March, although bird keepers in England are still required by law to comply with biosecurity measures.

For more information, please click here.