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British hedgehog classed as vulnerable to extinction
"It is not enough to rely on the goodwill of individuals to protect this important creature" - BHPS.
Government urged to enforce wildlife-friendly practices. 

The British hedgehog has been officially classed as vulnerable to extinction in the UK by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

According to a report by the Mammal Society, one-quarter of all British mammals are now on the brink of disappearing altogether, including the red squirrel, Eurasian beaver and the grey long-eared bat.

The British Hedgehog Preservation Society (BHPS) said the hedgehog's inclusion on the Red List for Britain's Mammals provides an opportunity to increase awareness of protecting hedgehog habitats, and to raise the importance of keeping these habitats connected.

The charity is calling on MPs to increase the protection offered to the hedgehog under the Wildlife and Countryside Act by moving it to schedule 5, allowing the level of protection appropriate for such a keystone species in decline.

“What people do on behalf of the hedgehog is amazing,” said Fay Vass, CEO of the BHPS. “The holes made in fences, the feeding, the hedgehog houses, the wildlife-friendly planting, the removal of hazards - all makes such a difference locally.

“But it is not enough to rely on the goodwill of individuals to protect this important creature. We need the Government to enforce wildlife-friendly practices. From farming to development to transport - wildlife needs to be taken seriously.”

The People's Trust for Endangered Species (PTES), which runs the Hedgehog Street Campaign in collaboration with the BHPS, also welcomed the opportunity to further protect these important creatures.

A PTES spokesperson said: “The IUCN’s backing reaffirms the importance of monitoring and the efforts of thousands of volunteers recording species that face an imminent threat of extinction. It is a stark reminder that the extinction crisis is happening not just in rainforests and tropical oceans, but in the countryside and waters of these shores.”

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Vets asked to opt-in to Scottish SPCA fostering programme

News Story 1
 The Scottish SPCA is encouraging veterinary practices to opt into its new fostering programme, by agreeing to register foster animals when approached by one of the foster carers.

The programme goes live in August 2021, and will help to rehabilitate animals under the Scottish SPCA's care until they are able to be properly re-homed. The programme will help the animals to receive care and attention in a stable and happy home environment, as some animals do not cope with a rescue and re-homing centre environment as well as others.

Specific information for veterinary practices on the new programme can be found at www.scottishspca.org/veterinarysurgeons 

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News Shorts
Webinar provides insight into old age pets

A new webinar providing insights into the BSAVA PetSavers Old Age Pets citizen science project is now available free of charge to its members via the BSAVA Library

The webinar presents an exclusive insight into the research process and progression of the study, which aims to help veterinary professionals and owners provide the best care for their senior dogs.

It also discusses the study's research methods, the researchers' personal interests in this area of study, and how they envisage the findings being used to create a guidance tool to improve discussions between vets and owners about their ageing dogs.