Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

How to reduce face-to-face contact in veterinary practices
Alternative methods of communication can be used to carry out consultations and triage.

Social distancing for veterinary teams

Current government advice states that veterinary practices must reduce face to face contact immediately, in order to reduce transmission of COVID-19. This article covers several methods of introducing social distancing measures in practice, whilst continuing to provide veterinary care.

Alternative communication methods

Use of technology, such as video or telephone calls, can be used to carry out certain consultations remotely. This also offers an alternative mode of working from home for veterinary surgeons.

Additionally, web tools – such as online chat support – emails and text messages can be used to maintain effective communication. Clients can be asked to send photos of their pets using these platforms, to aid in examinations and triage.

Limiting footfall in practice

If a client needs to visit the practice, social distancing can be maintained by requesting that only one person accompanies an animal per appointment, as well as by asking clients to wait in their cars, allowing staff to bring animals into the building for examination.

Clients can also be asked to wait in the carpark to collect prescriptions. Or these could be posted to the client's home.

If you have any suggestions on how to further reduce face to face contact in veterinary practices, please email editor@mrcvs.co.uk

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Tickets on sale for horse welfare conference

News Story 1
 Tickets are now on sale for the 'Welfare and Performance of the Ridden Horse' conference, due to take place at Nottingham University on Saturday, 11 December 2021.

World-renowned researchers, including Prof. Hilary Clayton and Dr Sue Dyson, will deliver the latest research updates. There will also be interactive Q&A sessions throughout the day, interactive polls and a fun evening of entertainment.

Organisers say that in the event of further coronavirus restrictions, day tickets will be transferred to livestream tickets. For more information about the conference and to book your place, click here.  

Click here for more...
News Shorts
More cases of African swine fever confirmed in Germany

More cases of African swine fever (ASF) have been confirmed in wild boar in Germany.

According to Pig World, 20 outbreaks have been identified in two districts - Brandenburg, where the original case confirmed on September 10 was found, and near the town of Neuzelle, some 7.5 km away.

The finding represents a further seven cases confirmed by Germany's Friedrich-Loeffler Institute. A Central Crisis Team has been established to coordinate the response to the outbreak.