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Bayer issues warning over fake Seresto collars
Bayer says the Seresto collar has become a prime target for fraudsters.
Vets urged to help identify and report counterfeits 

Bayer is making vets aware of a growing problem with counterfeit Seresto flea and tick collars. The company has released a video to help vets identify the illegal products.

The Seresto collar promises to protect pets from fleas and ticks for up to eight months, but Bayer says it has become a prime target for fraudsters.

“It is something we have been dealing with on a smaller scale for a while, but is becoming a more prominent problem with the increasing popularity of the product in the UK,” said Hannah Watts, senior brand manager for the product.

“Illegal products are damaging for everyone: for companies who invest heavily in bringing safe, efficacious products to market only for them to be undersold, for pet owners who waste money buying illegal products that don’t work, and for pets who receive treatments and preventatives that do not promote their health, but instead may even pose a risk to it.”

The company has launched a campaign to educate pet owners on where to buy the product safely. It says vets can play a key role in helping to stamp out the illegal products, by identifying and reporting the fake collars when they come across them in consultation with pet owners.

Hannah Watts added: “We want to ensure vets are aware that counterfeit products are out there, and equip them with the knowledge to be able to identify them, particularly where a pet owner has purchased an illegal collar under the impression it is Seresto, only to experience a treatment failure, where these animals may be presented to a vet.

“It is only if we are informed about these cases, we can get to the root of the problem, and ensure more pets and their owners don’t fall victim.”

Bayer have released the following video to help vets identify fake collars:

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Budding 'Dr Dolittles' sought for writing competition

News Story 1
 Vets are being invited to enter a writing competition run by the Page Turner Awards for a chance to get their story published or even made into a film.

Dubbed the 'Rolls Royce' of writing awards, the Page Turner competition provides an opportunity for aspiring writers to submit unpublished fiction and non-fiction work to be read by a panel of influential players in the publishing industry.

A spokesperson said: 'Do you think of yourself as a magical healer, like Dr Dolittle. Or maybe you have a story to share about the times when, sadly, animals can't be treated, and pet owners reflect on those moments they took for granted."

For more information, visit pageturnerawards.com 

Click here for more...
News Shorts
Avian influenza confirmed in Lancashire

A case of highly pathogenic (HPAI H5N8) avian influenza has been confirmed in two captive peregrine falcons on a non-commercial, non-poultry premises near Skelmersdale, West Lancashire.

Following a risk assessment, APHA has declared that no disease control zones have been put in place surrounding this non-commercial, non-poultry premises.

Eighteen cases of HPAI H5N8 have now been identified in poultry and other captive birds in England. A housing order for poultry and captive birds introduced by Defra to control the spread of the disease expired on 31 March, although bird keepers in England are still required by law to comply with biosecurity measures.

For more information, please click here.