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DNA testing schemes approved for English setters
NCL is a severe inherited disease that causes gradual degeneration of the nervous system.
Kennel Club approves PRA and NCL schemes 

New DNA testing schemes have been approved for two conditions in English setters, the Kennel Club has announced.

The tests screen for progressive retinal atrophy (PRA-rcd4) and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL).

A number of dog breeds are predisposed to PRA, which is characterised by bilateral degeneration of the retina. This causes progressive loss of vision, eventually leading to total blindness.

There is no treatment for PRA, so dog breeders are advised to use DNA tests to screen their animals and factor the results into their breeding programmes.

NCL is a severe inherited disease that causes gradual degeneration of the nervous system. Signs and symptoms are variable but generally include dementia, loss of vision and epilepsy.

A list of laboratories from which the Kennel Club can record results can be found on its website.

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Regional Representatives nominations sought

News Story 1
 Seven new regional representatives are being sought by the British Veterinary Association (BVA) to speak for vets from those regions and to represent their views to BVA Council.

The opportunities are available in in the North-East, Yorkshire & Humber, East Midlands, West Midlands, London, Wales, and Northern Ireland. Representatives from all sectors of the veterinary profession are urged to apply.

BVA president Daniella Dos Santos, said: "Our regional representatives are integral to that mission and to the activities of Council - contributing to effective horizon scanning on matters of veterinary policy and providing an informed steer to BVA’s Policy Committee.” 

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Livestock Antibody Hub receives funding boost

The Pirbright Institute has received US $5.5 million from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to form a Livestock Antibody Hub aimed at supporting animal and human health. The work will bring together researchers from across the UK utilise research outcomes in livestock disease and immunology.

Dr Doug Brown, chief executive of the British Society for Immunology, commented: “The UK is a world leader in veterinary immunology research, and this transformative investment from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation will drive the next chapter of innovation in developing new treatments and prevention options against livestock diseases".