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New case of equine viral arteritis
“These findings remind us that we must all be vigilant for signs of disease and how essential it is to following strict biosecurity measures.”

Outbreak thought to be ‘unrelated’ to Devon and Dorset cases

A new case of equine viral arteritis (EVA) has been confirmed in a non-thoroughbred stallion at a premises in Shropshire, the APHA has revealed.

Investigations into the source and spread of the disease are ongoing, but the case is currently thought to be unrelated to the outbreaks in Devon and Dorset earlier this year.

Breeding and movement restrictions have been placed on the animal and will remain in force until the risk has been mitigated. The owner of the horse has said they intend to have the stallion castrated, which will prevent further disease spread.

Deputy chief veterinary officer Graeme Cooke said: “We are taking action to limit the risk of the disease spreading by placing breeding and movement restrictions on the animal. A full investigation is continuing to consider the source and possible spread of the infection. Owners of mares and stallions are always urged as a routine to have their horses tested before they are used for breeding.

“These findings remind us that we must all be vigilant for signs of disease and how essential it is to following strict biosecurity measures.”

In April this year, Defra confirmed the first outbreak of EVA in Britain since 2012, in three non-thoroughbred stallions at a premises in Dorset. The following month, a second outbreak was confirmed in a stallion in Devon, which had close epidemiological links to the premises in Dorset.

EVA is a notifiable disease in all stallions, and in mares that have been mated or inseminated in the past 14 days. Suspected cases must be reported to APHA immediately by calling the Defra Rural Services Helpline on 03000 200 301.

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New York to ban sale of foie gras

News Story 1
 New York City councillors have voted overwhelmingly in favour of legislation that will see the ban of foie gras in the city. The move, which comes in response to animal cruelty concerns, will take effect in 2022.


 Councillor Carlina Rivera, who sponsored the legislation, told the New York Times that her bill “tackles the most inhumane process” in the commercial food industry. “This is one of the most violent practices, and it’s done for a purely luxury product,” she said.


 Foie gras is a food product made of the liver of a goose or duck that has been fattened, often by force-feeding. New York City is one of America’s largest markets for the product, with around 1,000 restaurants currently offering it on their menu. 

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Humane Slaughter Association student scholarships open for applications

Applications for the Humane Slaughter Association’s student/trainee Dorothy Sidley Memorial Scholarships are now open.

The Scholarships provide funding to enable students or trainees in the industry to undertake a project aimed at improving the welfare of food animals during marketing, transport and slaughter. The project may be carried out as an integral part of a student's coursework over an academic year, or during the summer break.

The deadline for applications is midnight on the 28 February 2020. To apply and for further information visit www.hsa.org.uk/grants or contact the HSA office.