Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

‘More research’ needed on CBD oil - BVA
BVA said there is a lack of robust evidence to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of CBD in pets.
Small pilot study suggests it can reduce epileptic seizures 

The British Veterinary Association has said more research is needed on the potential benefits and risks of cannabidiol (CBD) before proper regulation is brought in.

This follows a new pilot study by Colorado State University, which found that CBD oil could reduce the frequency of seizures in dogs with epilepsy, when given alongside conventional treatment.

The small study of 16 dogs assessed the short-term effect of CBD on seizure frequency. Nine dogs were treated with CBD for 12 weeks, while seven received a placebo. All dogs continued to receive standard anticonvulsant drugs, including phenobarbital and potassium bromide.

Of the dogs who received CBD, 89 per cent saw a reduction in the number of seizures they experienced. Researchers said there was a significant correlation between the degree of seizure reduction and the amount of CBD concentration in the dog’s blood. The findings have been published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association.

Responding to the study, BVA said there is a lack of robust evidence to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of CBD in pets.

Junior vice president Daniella Dos Santos said: “The use of cannabidiol (CBD) to treat pets is a live issue in the veterinary profession. While research is ongoing to look into its efficacy and risks, there is currently a lack of sufficient robust evidence to demonstrate health benefits and safety of CBD use in pets.
 
“The veterinary medicines regulator has stated that any products containing CBD must be regulated as a medicine, supported by scientific evidence and rigorously tested. At present no CBD-based products have been granted veterinary marketing authorisation in the UK.”

Pet owners who are concerned about their pet’s health should speak to their local vet for professional advice on safe and effective treatments, she added.

The Colorado team are now working on further research to determine whether a higher dosage could reduce seizures by more than 50 per cent. The study, which launched in January last year, aims to enrol 60 dogs. 

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

RSPCA braced for ‘hectic hedgehog month’

News Story 1
 The RSPCA says that it is bracing itself for a ‘hectic hedgehog month’ after calls to the charity about the creatures peaked this time last year.

More than 10,000 calls about hedgehogs were made to the RSPCA’s national helpline in 2018, 1,867 of which were in July. This compares with just 133 calls received in February of the same year.

Evie Button, the RSPCA’s scientific officer, said: “July is our busiest month for hedgehogs. Not only do calls about hedgehogs peak, but so do admissions to our four wildlife centres as members of the public and our own officers bring in orphaned, sick or injured animals for treatment and rehabilitation.” 

Click here for more...
News Shorts
ASF traces found in seized meat at NI airport

More than 300kg of illegal meat and dairy products were seized at Northern Ireland’s airports in June, DAERA has revealed.

A sample of these were tested at the Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, resulting in the detection of African swine fever DNA fragments.

DAERA said that while the discovery does not pose a significant threat to Northern Ireland’s animal health status, it underlines the importance of controls placed on personal imports of meat and dairy products. Holidaymakers travelling overseas are being reminded not to bring any animal or plant products back home.