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Third party puppy and kitten sales set to be banned
The legislation is planned to come into force on the 6 April 2020. 

‘Lucy’s Law’ legislation also aims to deter puppy smugglers 

A new law aimed at bringing an end to puppy and kitten farming is being laid before before Parliament today (13 May).

Known as ‘Lucy’s Law’, the legislation is planned to come into force on the 6 April 2020 and will ban the sale of puppies and kittens via third-party sellers such as pet shops and commercial dealers.

Announcing the move, environment secretary Michael Gove said the ban will give animals "the best possible start in life".

He added: “It will put an end to the early separation of puppies and kittens from their mothers, as well as the terrible conditions in which some of these animals are bred."

Defra stressed that the ban is also set to deter puppy smugglers, who abuse the Pet Travel Scheme (PETS) by bringing underage animals into the UK for sale.

The law is named after Lucy, a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, who died in 2016 after being poorly mistreated on a Welsh puppy farm. Marc Abraham, Lucy’s Law campaigner and founder of Pup Aid said:

“I’m absolutely thrilled that Lucy’s Law is now being laid in Parliament and will come into effect from April 2020. For years irresponsible breeders in the UK and abroad, so-called puppy farmers, have depended on commercial third-party sellers – e.g. dealers and pet shops – to keep their breeding dogs and puppies in horrific conditions hidden from the public.

“Lucy’s Law is named after one of the sweetest, bravest dogs I’ve ever known, and is a fitting tribute to all the victims of the cruel third party puppy trade, both past and present.

“On behalf of my fellow grassroots campaigners I’d like to thank Mr Gove, Defra officials, and every single supporter, parliamentarian, celebrities, and ethical animal welfare organisation that has proudly helped make Lucy’s Law a reality.”

Claire Horton, chief Executive of Battersea Dogs and Cats Home also welcomed the news.

“Each year thousands of puppies are bred in terrible conditions and then sold for large sums of money to unsuspecting members of the public,” she said.  “A lot of these young pups will be sickly and under-socialised, leading to high vet bills and behavioural issues that a lot of new owners are sadly not able to deal with.

“Once these new regulations are approved, owners will have far greater reassurance that their new pet is happy and healthy, whether they buy from a responsible breeder or from a rescue centre such as Battersea.”

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Registrations open for overseas veterinary professionals course

News Story 1
 Registrations are now open for the RCVS CPD course for overseas veterinary professionals, which covers an introduction to the UK veterinary professions.

The course is aimed at overseas-qualified veterinary surgeons and nurses during their first two years of working in the UK, in addition to those considering working here. It provides graduates with the key information and skills required to practice in the UK, as well as helping them understand their legal duties as veterinary professionals.

For more information and to book your place please click here. The course will be held at Belgravia House, London, on Wednesday 12 June.  

Click here for more...
News Shorts
BVA launches award to celebrate young vets

A new award has been launched to celebrate inspirational young vets who are making a difference in their day to day work.

Nominations are now open for the BVA Young Vet of the Year Award, which is the first of its kind. It is open to all vets registered with the RCVS in the first eight years of their careers, working in any veterinary sphere, including clinical practice, research, education or veterinary politics. Organisers are looking for an ‘exceptional young vet’ whose work has benefitted the veterinary community or the workplace.

The awards are open for self-entry and nominations by 1 August 2019. The winner will be announced at London Vet Show on 14 November 2019, where a £1000 cash prize will be awarded, alongside a ‘career enhancing experience’ with Zoetis.