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Bayer issues warning over fake Seresto collars
Bayer says the Seresto collar has become a prime target for fraudsters.
Vets urged to help identify and report counterfeits 

Bayer is making vets aware of a growing problem with counterfeit Seresto flea and tick collars. The company has released a video to help vets identify the illegal products.

The Seresto collar promises to protect pets from fleas and ticks for up to eight months, but Bayer says it has become a prime target for fraudsters.

“It is something we have been dealing with on a smaller scale for a while, but is becoming a more prominent problem with the increasing popularity of the product in the UK,” said Hannah Watts, senior brand manager for the product.

“Illegal products are damaging for everyone: for companies who invest heavily in bringing safe, efficacious products to market only for them to be undersold, for pet owners who waste money buying illegal products that don’t work, and for pets who receive treatments and preventatives that do not promote their health, but instead may even pose a risk to it.”

The company has launched a campaign to educate pet owners on where to buy the product safely. It says vets can play a key role in helping to stamp out the illegal products, by identifying and reporting the fake collars when they come across them in consultation with pet owners.

Hannah Watts added: “We want to ensure vets are aware that counterfeit products are out there, and equip them with the knowledge to be able to identify them, particularly where a pet owner has purchased an illegal collar under the impression it is Seresto, only to experience a treatment failure, where these animals may be presented to a vet.

“It is only if we are informed about these cases, we can get to the root of the problem, and ensure more pets and their owners don’t fall victim.”

Bayer have released the following video to help vets identify fake collars:

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BEVA gives vets access to free membership for 3 months

News Story 1
 BEVA has announced that it is cutting membership renewal charges for the next three months in order to support all veterinary professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Memberships for all existing BEVA members will be extended until 30 June 2020. Veterinary professionals who are not members of BEVA will also be able to sign up for a free membership until 30 June 2020.

BEVA president Tim Mair said: "In this extraordinary time of global crisis our profession, as with many industries, is under immense pressure. By offering free membership we are giving equine vets easy access to a wealth of supportive resources and online CPD."

To sign up please visit the BEVA website.

Image (c) BEVA. 

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LOVE Gorgie Farm seeking veterinary volunteers

LOVE Gorgie Farm in Edinburgh is looking for people with veterinary and animal care experience, who would be interested in volunteering to help care for its animals during these difficult times.

The community-owned charity farm opened to the public only last month, but decided to close temporarily amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Its three-person team is working to care for the animals behind the scenes and the farm is now operating as a food bank for the public, delivering free breakfasts to local school children.

In an effort to build a contingency plan to secure the welfare of its animals, LOVE Gorgie Farm is looking for volunteers who would be able to step in if any team members fell sick or needed to self-isolate.

Those interested in volunteering are asked to contact gorgie@l-o-v-e.org.uk