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Landmark report sheds light on discrimination 
Sex discrimination was the most common type reported and was particularly prevalent in academic settings and production animal, equine and mixed practices.

BVA launches ‘Big Conversation’ after “truly shocking” findings 

Nearly a quarter of vets and vet students have experienced or witnessed discrimination in the past year, according to a landmark report by the BVA.

Figures show 16 per cent of vets and vet students surveyed had personally experienced discrimination within a veterinary workplace or learning environment in the past 12 months.

Despite this, only 56 per cent of respondents said they were concerned about discrimination.

Senior colleagues were most commonly responsible for the discrimination, accounting for nearly half of all incidents (47 per cent), while clients accounted for 35 per cent of incidents.

Worryingly, only 12 per cent of respondents were satisfied with how their incident had been handled, which rose to 23 per cent among those who felt able to report the incident.

Sex discrimination was the most common type reported (44 per cent of incidents) and was found to be particularly prevalent in academic settings and production animal, equine and mixed practices.

Race discrimination was the second most commonly reported, accounting for 27 per cent of incidents. Survey participants also reported discrimination relating to age, sexuality, disability and gender reassignment.

Younger vets were more likely to have experienced discrimination than older vets - 27 per cent of those under 35 had experienced discrimination. Female vets were more than twice as likely to experience discrimination than their male colleagues - 19 per cent and eight per cent respectively.

The prevalence of discrimination was also higher among vets from minority ethnic backgrounds, and those who described their sexual orientation as bi, gay or lesbian were more than twice as likely to have experienced discrimination.

'Big Conversation'
BVA’s junior vice-president Daniella Dos Santos called the findings “truly shocking”.

She added: “It is completely unacceptable that so many members of the veterinary team are subject to discrimination not just from clients but from members of our own profession.
 
“Worryingly, it seems that the scale of the issue will come as a surprise to many members of our profession and so it is vital that we all join the conversation and reflect on what role we can play to improve equality and inclusion.

"The veterinary team must become a safe and supportive environment for everyone. We cannot accept anything less for ourselves, for our colleagues and for our profession.”

The BVA is asking all members of the profession to get involved in its ‘Big Conversation’ on equality and inclusion, which is launching this week. Veterinary teams across the UK will be able to join online engagement sessions and BVA members are being asked to share their views with regional representatives ahead of a council meeting on 24 July.
 

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Zoo animals step on the scales for annual weigh-in

News Story 1
 Squirrel monkeys, penguins and meerkats are just some of the animals that stepped on the scales on Thursday (22 August) for the start of ZSL London Zoo’s annual weigh-in.

The annual event gives keepers a chance to check the animals in their care are healthy, eating well and growing at the correct weight. Keepers say that a growing waistline can also help them to detect pregnancies, which is vital as many of the species at the zoo are endangered.

The data is then added to a database shared with zoos and conservationists across the globe. This helps keepers to compare information and provide better care for the species they are fighting to protect.  

Click here for more...
News Shorts
Professor Abdul Rahman announced as keynote speaker for BVA Members’ Day 2019

Celebrated Indian vet and parasitologist Professor Abdul Rahman is set to deliver the keynote speech at BVA Members’ Day 2019.

Professor Rahman will present his insights into the human behaviour challenges of controlling zoonotic disease in his talk: ‘A One Health approach to rabies elimination in Asia’. The talk will outline efforts to gain political support for dog vaccination programmes in China, as well as the need for a collaborative approach between vets, public health, livestock and animal welfare agencies.

The event takes place on Thursday, 19 September at Brangwyn Hall, Swansea. Tickets are free but must be reserved through the BVA website as places are limited.