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Disabled dog finds baby buried alive
The baby was discovered in Bangkok's Ban Nong Kham district.

Ping Pong alerted locals to baby’s location by digging

A disabled dog from Thailand has been praised after finding a baby boy buried alive in a field.

Six-year-old Ping Pong, who only has three legs, made the discovery last Wednesday (15 May) in Bangkok’s Ban Nong Kham district. According to The Guardian, he alerted locals to the child’s location by digging up a patch of dirt.

Owner Isa Nisaika told local media that the digging revealed the baby’s legs, prompting local farmers to pull the baby to safety.

“I heard a dog barking and a baby crying in a cassava plantation, so I went there to check,” he said. “The dog was digging up a dirt pile and the baby’s legs emerged.”

He added: “Ping Pong was hit by a car, so he’s disabled. But I kept him because he’s so loyal and obedient, and always helps me out when I go into the fields to tend to my cattle. He’s loved by the entire village. It’s amazing he found the baby.”

A 15-year-old girl is said to have confessed to burying the child over a fear of retribution by her father. She has since been charged with attempted murder and the baby will be looked after by her parents.

Image (C) scem.info

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Pair of endangered Amur leopard cubs born at Colchester Zoo

News Story 1
 Keepers at Colchester Zoo are hailing the arrival of a pair of critically endangered Amur leopard cubs.

The cubs were born to first-time parents Esra and Crispin on the 9 September. This is the first time the Zoo has bred Amur leopard cubs on-site.

Amur leopards originate from the Russian Far East and north-east China. In the wild they are threatened by climate change, habitat loss, deforestation and the illegal wildlife trade.

The cubs are said to be “looking well” and are expected to emerge from their den in a few weeks.  

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RCVS names Professor John Innes as chair of Fellowship Board

Professor John Innes has been elected chair of the 2019 RCVS Fellowship Board, replacing Professor Nick Bacon who comes to the end of his three-year term.


Professor Innes will be responsible for making sure the Fellowship progresses towards fulfilling its strategic goals, determining its ongoing strategy and objectives, and reporting to the RCVS Advancement of the Professions Committee on developments within the Fellowship.