Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

Consultation opens on risk classification of veterinary antimicrobials
The updated categorisation includes additional criteria, such as the availability of alternative antimicrobials.
Updated categorisation considers all classes of antimicrobials

The European Medicines Agency (EMA) has opened a public consultation on the risk classification of antimicrobials used in animals.

The consultation follows the publication of updated scientific advice on the impact of veterinary antimicrobials on public and animal health. Once finalised, it will help decision-makers in the EU create guidelines for use of antimicrobials in veterinary medicine.

Prepared by the Antimicrobial Advice Ad Hoc Expert Group (AMEG), the update considers the experience gained since the categorisation of antimicrobials was first published in 2014.

In the 2014 classification, three categories were proposed for the classification of Critically Important antimicrobials. These are defined by the World Health Organisation as the most relevant for human health.

The updated categorisation considers all classes of antimicrobials and includes additional criteria, such as the availability of alternative antimicrobials in veterinary medicine. It is comprised of four categories (A-D), of which each are accompanied by an action word for clarity:

    •    Category A (“Avoid”) includes antimicrobial classes not currently authorised in veterinary medicine in the EU. For these medicines, their use in food-producing animals is prohibited and they may be given to individual companion animals only under exceptional circumstances.
    •    Category B (“Restrict”) refers to quinolones, 3rd- and 4th-generation cephalosporins and polymyxins. Use of these antimicrobials in animals should be restricted to mitigate the risk to public health.
    •    Category C (“Caution”) covers antimicrobials for which, in general, alternatives in human medicine in the EU exist, but in veterinary medicine there are only few alternatives in certain indications. These antimicrobials should only be used when there are no antimicrobial substances in Category D that would be effective.
    •    Category D (“Prudence”) is the lowest risk category. Antimicrobials belonging to this category can be used in animals in a prudent manner. This means that unnecessary use and long treatment periods should be avoided and group treatment should be restricted to situations where individual treatment is not feasible.
   
The consultation will remain until 30 April 2018. Comments should be submitted to vet-guidelines@ema.europa.eu using this template.

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Public urged to provide homes for swifts

News Story 1
 The RSPB is calling on the public to help provide new homes for swifts, as figures show the birds' numbers have fallen to less than half what they were 20 years ago.

Swifts arrive in the UK late April-May and can spend up to three months in the country. The RSPB attributes the birds’ decline to modern buildings, which lack the nooks and crannies they need to build nests.

While some house builders have agreed to integrate swift homes into new buildings, the RSPB believes more can be done to help this incredible bird. 'Just, 1,000 additional new nest boxes could make a difference’, the charity said.  

Click here for more...
News Shorts
Detection time for omeprazole reduced to 48 hours in racehorses

The British Horseracing Authority (BHA) has announced that the detection time for omeprazole has been reduced from 72 hours to 48 hours. This is effective from 1 February 2019.

Omeprazole can be prescribed for the management of gastric ulcers in racehorses; however, studies have recently become available that show no direct effect of omeprazole on performance.

Tim Morris, the Authority’s Director of Equine Science and Welfare, commented: “Medication control in horse racing is essential to allow treatment for good welfare but also to ensure fair racing by medication withdrawal before racing. Trainers have asked for more information, especially on anti-ulcer medications, and we have used existing information to make a harmonised detection time for omeprazole available as soon as we could.”