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Vets and medics join forces to remove horse’s sinus tumour
“We were able to remove a substantial portion of the tumor in order to open the sinus cavity and take any pressure off Honesto’s eye socket and brain." (Stock image)
Image-guided techniques allowed safe tumour removal 

Equine vets have teamed up with a human doctor to carry out the first image-guided removal of a sinus tumour in a horse.

Six-year-old horse Honesto had a massive sinus osteoma. Radiographs and a CT scan taken by the UC Davis veterinary hospital in California showed the mass was encroaching on his eye socket and blocking the right nasal cavity and numerous sinuses, including the frontal sinus directly in front of the brain.

Surgery was required to prevent the tumour growing and causing injury to the eye and brain. However, the usual method is to make a large incision in the area to burr and chisel the tumour away. Using this technique, there is no way for surgeons to determine how close they are to critical areas such as the eye and brain.

Deciding how to proceed, Honesto’s owner Angela Langen discussed the case with her close friend George Domb, who is an ear, nose and throat doctor. He suggested a method used in human medicine, which uses an image-guided navigation system so that surgeons can operate on the tumour whilst identifying the precise position of their instruments on a CT scan.

Dr Domb worked with Dr Larry Galuppo, chief of the equine surgery and lameness service at UC Davis, to undertake the procedure.

Honesto recovered well from the anaesthesia and returned home two days after surgery. At his one-week check up, Dr Galuppo noted significant progress and removed his sinus irrigation tube. After another week, Honesto’s skin staples were removed.

“We were pleased to see that the procedure worked well,” said Dr Galuppo. “We were able to remove a substantial portion of the tumor in order to open the sinus cavity and take any pressure off Honesto’s eye socket and brain. He’s one tough horse.”

Dr Domb added: “This was the first time I’ve ever seen surgery on a horse, much less participated. It was amazing how the anesthesia team took care of Honesto, and collaborating with the entire veterinary team at UC Davis was a wonderful experience. Dr. Galuppo and everyone on the equine surgery team made the whole procedure flawless.

The team plan to have further discussions about utilising human sinus treatments in veterinary medicine.

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Endangered turtles rescued from smugglers

News Story 1
 A group of endangered turtles have found a new home at London Zoo after being rescued from smugglers.

The four big-headed turtles arrived at the zoo at the end of last year, after smugglers tried to illegally import them to Canada, labelled as toys.

One of the turtles, named Lady Triệu after a Vietnamese warrioress, has moved to a new exhibit in the zoo’s reptile house. She is the only one of her kind in a UK zoo.

Big-headed turtles have such large heads that they cannot pull them back into their shells. To compensate, they have armour plating from head to tail and a very sharp beak to fend off predators. They are ranked number 18 on ZSL’s EDGE of Existence reptile list, which puts threatened species at the forefront of conservation action. Image © ZSL  

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Professor Abdul Rahman announced as keynote speaker for BVA Members’ Day 2019

Celebrated Indian vet and parasitologist Professor Abdul Rahman is set to deliver the keynote speech at BVA Members’ Day 2019.

Professor Rahman will present his insights into the human behaviour challenges of controlling zoonotic disease in his talk: ‘A One Health approach to rabies elimination in Asia’. The talk will outline efforts to gain political support for dog vaccination programmes in China, as well as the need for a collaborative approach between vets, public health, livestock and animal welfare agencies.

The event takes place on Thursday, 19 September at Brangwyn Hall, Swansea. Tickets are free but must be reserved through the BVA website as places are limited.