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Goats to help prevent wildfires in Nevada City
Prescriptive grazing can cost $500-$1,000 per acre and around 200 goats can knock down an acre a day.
City council seeking goats to graze greenbelt

Nevada City council is seeking funds to get a cohort of goats to graze over 450 acres of greenbelt, in a bid to reduce the risk of wildfires.

A GoFundMe page has already garnered over $20,000 out of the $30,000 target.

Goats will graze on bushes, trees and manzanita, while sheep graze on grass.

The move comes after unprecedented fires in California, particularly Paradise. However, time is of the essence, as local ranchers have already rented out their goats and sheep for the spring, summer and autumn, so the project must be carried out this winter.

Prescriptive grazing can cost $500-$1,000 per acre and around 200 goats can knock down an acre a day. The council is prioritising where the risk is at its highest.

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Wales to ban third party puppy and kitten sales

News Story 1
 The Welsh Government has said it will ban third party sales of puppies and kittens, after a consultation showed overwhelming public support.

A consultation in February received nearly 500 responses, most of whom called for greater action to improve the welfare of cats and dogs at all breeding premises.

Concerns were also raised about online sales, impulse buying, breeder accountability and illegal puppy imports.

A consultation will now be held on plans to implement a ban. Environment minister Lesley Griffiths said she will also revisit the current breeding regulations to improve welfare conditions.  

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News Shorts
Concern over fall in Russian bee populations

Bee populations in Russia have fallen significantly in large parts of Russia, prompting fears the deaths will raise the price of honey, in addition to those of other popular foods.

According to BBC News, around 20 regions in central and southern Russia have been affected, including Saratov and Ulyanovsk on the Volga River and Bryansk and Kursk, south of Moscow.

The head of the Russian Beekeepersí Union, Arnold Butov, said the Unionís members were gathering data on the losses and will be submitting a report to the Russian government by August 1.