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Home Direct service to alleviate horse crisis
The service will free-up space in the charity's equine centres for urgent neglect or abandonment cases.

Service will free-up valuable space in rescue centres 

A service to help owners find suitable new homes for their horses if they can no longer keep them has been launched by Blue Cross.

The charity’s Home Direct scheme
comes after the success of a similar Blue Cross programme for small animals, which was introduced in 2010. It will mean the charity can keep valuable space free at its rescue centres, ready for any urgent neglect or abandonment cases.

“We receive daily emails from owners who are unable to keep their horses any longer, says Emily Lambert, rehoming coordinator at Blue Cross. “The reason may be anything from the owner’s failing health to horses that cannot no longer be ridden.
 
“We also have frequent calls from owners looking for help and advice on their horses and sometimes just listening and talking gives people the peace of mind that they are making the right decision.”

Equine charities are currently receiving a high volume of calls every month from horse owners seeking new homes for their animals. With more than one million horses and donkeys in the UK, the charitable sector has limited available space and must prioritise welfare and rescue cases.

Home Direct will enable Blue Cross to care and support even more hoses. Under the scheme, every horse will be assessed by a member of the Blue Cross team and then advertised on the charity’s website.

When a potential new owner has been found, Blue Cross will arrange and oversee an initial visit and, if it is a good match, the horse will be re-homed.

“We would much rather people approach us whilst their horses are still healthy than risk them being passed from pillar to post and potentially ending up in a welfare compromised situation and making more work for charities,” Emily continues. “The great thing about Home Direct is we are helping people as much as we are helping horses.”

The Home Direct service is being offered to other equine welfare charities that don’t specialise in rehoming. Any horse can be considered for the scheme, as long as they pass a health check and are not on any long term medication.
 

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ZSL London Zoo shares animal X-rays

News Story 1
 A selection of X-ray images showing the inner workings of frogs, turtles, snakes and geckos have been shared by veterinary surgeons at ZSL London Zoo.

Taken as part of a routine health check, the images have been shared as part of ‘Vets in Action’ week - a hand’s on role-playing experience for children that explores the life of a zoo vet.

ZSL London Zoo veterinary nurse Heather Mackintosh said: “It’s great to be able to share the work that goes on behind the scenes at the Zoo to keep our residents in tip-top condition – and our visitors are always amazed to find out more about their favourite animals.” 

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News Shorts
Vets in developing nations given free access to BSAVA’s online library

BSAVA has teamed up with the WSAVA, the WSAVA Foundation and FECAVA to offer vets in developing nations free access to its online library.

The Association’s ‘Foundation Collection’ is comprised of more than 70 hours of articles, lectures and book chapters covering topics such as basic handling skills, working on a budget and emergency triage. Some of the countries set to benefit include Albania, Georgia, Sri Lanka, Kenya, Nigeria, Uganda and Tanzania.

Nicolette Hayward, of BSAVA International Affairs Committee said: “Our mission is to promote excellence in small animal practice through education and science, so we are delighted to work with WSAVA, the WSAVA Foundation and FECAVA to share these high-quality resources to the veterinary profession in low and middle-income countries.”