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Government issues guidance on pet travel after Brexit
Pets must be effectively vaccinated against rabies before they travel.
Pet owners urged to consult with their vet in good time

The Government has issued advice to pet owners planning to travel to Europe after Brexit.

The advice states that in the event of a no-deal Brexit, pet owners may need to take additional steps before travelling. This includes a rabies vaccination followed by a blood test a minimum of 30 days later.

Pet owners planning to travel after 29 March 2019, should contact their vet at least four months ahead of travelling to get the latest advice, the advice states. If they intend to travel on 30 March 2019, for example, then they must discuss what is required with their vet before the end of November 2018.

Under the requirements, pets must be effectively vaccinated against rabies before they travel. This includes having an up-to-date rabies vaccination and a blood test to show sufficient levels of rabies antibody.

This blood test must take place at least 30 days after any initial rabies vaccination and a minimum of three months before the travel date. UK chief veterinary officer Christine Middlemiss urged pet owners to talk to their vet about health requirements in good time.

“Today we are giving practical and straightforward advice for people who wish to travel to Europe with their pets after we leave the EU in the unlikely event of a no-deal situation,” she said.

“I urge all pet owners who wish to travel immediately after 29 March 2019 to consult with their vet as soon as they can. This is about planning ahead to ensure their pet has the correct health protection documented and in place for all possible Exit scenarios.

“In recent weeks we have been in contact with vets to highlight this issue. They are expecting pet owners to consult with them and plan ahead.”

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Nominations for 2019 RSPCA Honours Awards now open

News Story 1
 People across the UK are being urged to nominate a standout animal champion for the 2019 RSPCA Honours Awards.

The awards recognise those who have worked tirelessly to improve animal welfare, campaigned on behalf of animals, or shown true bravery. Previous winners include comedian John Bishop, who was awarded Celebrity Animal Champion of the Year, and 11-year-old Lobby Cantwell, who raised more than £1,000 for the charity through mountain climbs and bike rides.

To submit a nomination or find out more about the awards visit the RSPCA website. Nominations will remain open until 4 pm on Friday, March 15.  

Click here for more...
News Shorts
New £1m project to investigate dairy cow lameness

Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC) is leading a new £1 million research project to investigate the causes of lameness in dairy cows.

One in three dairy cows are affected by lameness every day in the UK, costing the industry an estimated £250 milion annually.

The project will take three years to complete and is due to finish by November 2021.

Professor Georgios Banos of SRUC commented: “In addition to pain and discomfort to the animal, lameness is associated with decreased milk production and inflated farm costs.

“Among cows raised in the same environment, some become lame while others do not. Understanding the reasons behind this will help us develop targeted preventive practices contributing to enhanced animal welfare and farm profitability.”