Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

Brexit trade deals ‘biggest risk to animal welfare’
"The biggest risk to animal welfare post-Brexit would be the wrong kind of trade deal - or no trade deal at all."
Expert panel says imports must meet UK’s high welfare standards

Post-Brexit trade deals are the greatest threat to animal welfare, experts warned during a fringe event at the Conservative party conference.

The event, hosted by the RSPCA, saw an expert panel debate the future of higher welfare farming and British agriculture post-Brexit.

Agricultural experts warned that the government’s commitment to welfare in farming could be undermined if we do not insist on the same standards when striking international trade deals.

Vice president of the National Farmers Union, Stuart Roberts, said: “It is one thing to have the highest standards domestically in the UK but we have to use those same standards and ethics when it comes to future trade deals. Because otherwise all we’ll do is give politicians and consumers the opportunity to export their consciences.”

RSPCA’s head of public affairs David Bowles added: “The biggest risk to animal welfare post-Brexit would be the wrong kind of trade deal - or no trade deal at all. Ensuring animal products that are imported to the UK meet our high welfare standards must be a priority not just for animal welfare reasons but also to protect the integrity of UK food and the commercial viability of UK farming.”

Agriculture minister George Eustice confirmed the government’s commitment to protect UK animal welfare standards in any future trade deals. He also revealed that the new Agriculture Bill, which has a second reading on 10 October, will contain provisions for animal welfare payments to incentivise farms. Animal welfare pilot schemes will start in 2020 and could be given priority funding.

Mr Eustice said: “The way we treat animals is the hallmark of a civilised society … we won’t give up or change our standards in pursuit of a deal.”

The panel also agreed that consumers must be empowered to make better decisions about the meat and animal products they buy. They welcomed the definition of animal welfare as a public good, as well as the holistic approach to food production, animal health and welfare in the upcoming Agriculture Bill.

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Pair of endangered Amur leopard cubs born at Colchester Zoo

News Story 1
 Keepers at Colchester Zoo are hailing the arrival of a pair of critically endangered Amur leopard cubs.

The cubs were born to first-time parents Esra and Crispin on the 9 September. This is the first time the Zoo has bred Amur leopard cubs on-site.

Amur leopards originate from the Russian Far East and north-east China. In the wild they are threatened by climate change, habitat loss, deforestation and the illegal wildlife trade.

The cubs are said to be “looking well” and are expected to emerge from their den in a few weeks.  

Click here for more...
News Shorts
RCVS names Professor John Innes as chair of Fellowship Board

Professor John Innes has been elected chair of the 2019 RCVS Fellowship Board, replacing Professor Nick Bacon who comes to the end of his three-year term.


Professor Innes will be responsible for making sure the Fellowship progresses towards fulfilling its strategic goals, determining its ongoing strategy and objectives, and reporting to the RCVS Advancement of the Professions Committee on developments within the Fellowship.