Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

New project to improve care of wounds in horses
It is hoped that the analysis will result in new freely-accessible educational resources.
Horse owners asked to collaborate with researchers 

Vets are asking horse owners to take part in a new project to improve the management of skin and flesh wounds in horses.

The Equine Wound Project was launched online by the University of Nottingham and the British Horse Society.

Although wounds are a common emergency problem in horses, there is currently no clear guidance for owners on which types need to be treated by a vet, how long different wounds take to heal, or if the horse will return to normal work. As a result, it can be difficult for owners to make informed decisions.

Horse owners are being asked to submit information, including photos, about their horse’s initial wound, as well as the subsequent assessment, treatment and healing outcome. This will allow researchers to capture information on a wide range of injuries.

It is hoped that the analysis will result in new freely-accessible educational resources to support decision making, and improve owners’ recognition and care of wounds.

Masters student, Richard Birnie, who will be working on the project for the next 12 months, said: “During my third-year research project dissertation on equine wounds, I could see that this is a research area that urgently requires more focused studies.

“Wounds have been described as the second most commonly treated condition in equine practice, so I found the significant lack of evidence-based data surprising. I am very grateful to have been given the opportunity to conduct a year-long study on equine wounds working closely with The BHS and horse owners.

“Valuable data collected could be the beginnings of important findings that could have widespread impacts on how both vets and owners manage and treat wounds in the future, ultimately aiming to improve the health and welfare of horses."

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Pair of endangered Amur leopard cubs born at Colchester Zoo

News Story 1
 Keepers at Colchester Zoo are hailing the arrival of a pair of critically endangered Amur leopard cubs.

The cubs were born to first-time parents Esra and Crispin on the 9 September. This is the first time the Zoo has bred Amur leopard cubs on-site.

Amur leopards originate from the Russian Far East and north-east China. In the wild they are threatened by climate change, habitat loss, deforestation and the illegal wildlife trade.

The cubs are said to be “looking well” and are expected to emerge from their den in a few weeks.  

Click here for more...
News Shorts
RCVS names Professor John Innes as chair of Fellowship Board

Professor John Innes has been elected chair of the 2019 RCVS Fellowship Board, replacing Professor Nick Bacon who comes to the end of his three-year term.


Professor Innes will be responsible for making sure the Fellowship progresses towards fulfilling its strategic goals, determining its ongoing strategy and objectives, and reporting to the RCVS Advancement of the Professions Committee on developments within the Fellowship.