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Nurses take part in beach clean for VNAM
"Litter, especially plastics and fishing gear, can cause devastating and often life-threatening problems for our wildlife and eco system."

Plastic drinks caps among the most common rubbish items

Veterinary nurses took part in the first beach clean for Veterinary Nursing Awareness Month (VNAM) this year, clearing 27 bags of rubbish from Old Hunstanton Beach in Norfolk.

The beach clean, attended by over 40 people, was organised by BVNA Council member Jo Hinde and RVN Diane Westwood-Rowland.

“Veterinary nurses are often giving their very little spare time to causes that improve welfare for both humans and animals,” Jo Hinde said. “Beach cleans are a great example of this. Litter, especially plastics and fishing gear, can cause devastating and often life-threatening problems for our wildlife and eco system.

She added: “It was super to have the support of nurses and the general public on the day and help raise awareness of this problem as well as highlight some of the amazing things that veterinary nurses do.”

The most common waste items found during the beach clean were plastic caps from bottled drinks, cotton ear bud sticks and baby wipes. Other frequently found items were fishing netting, rope and monofilament lines, which can all be deadly to many animals.

Diane Westwood Rowland said: “The importance of the beach clean was highlighted when we sadly found two deceased animals, a seal and a gannet. We do not know what killed these beautiful creatures, but it reinforces the fact that humans need to wake up to the damage they are causing.”

There are plans to include the clean up in future VNAM campaigns and expand it to beaches across the UK.

Image © Jo Hinde
 

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Pair of endangered Amur leopard cubs born at Colchester Zoo

News Story 1
 Keepers at Colchester Zoo are hailing the arrival of a pair of critically endangered Amur leopard cubs.

The cubs were born to first-time parents Esra and Crispin on the 9 September. This is the first time the Zoo has bred Amur leopard cubs on-site.

Amur leopards originate from the Russian Far East and north-east China. In the wild they are threatened by climate change, habitat loss, deforestation and the illegal wildlife trade.

The cubs are said to be “looking well” and are expected to emerge from their den in a few weeks.  

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RCVS names Professor John Innes as chair of Fellowship Board

Professor John Innes has been elected chair of the 2019 RCVS Fellowship Board, replacing Professor Nick Bacon who comes to the end of his three-year term.


Professor Innes will be responsible for making sure the Fellowship progresses towards fulfilling its strategic goals, determining its ongoing strategy and objectives, and reporting to the RCVS Advancement of the Professions Committee on developments within the Fellowship.