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Horse health experts issue advice on worm control
Equitape is the only licenced product for horses containing praziquantel as a single active ingredient.

Equitape is to be discontinued from October 2018

Horse health professionals have issued best practice advice on managing worm burdens following news that Equitape is to be discontinued from sale in the UK.

In a joint press release, Westgate Laboratories, Austin Davis Biologics and Professor Jacqui Matthews of the Moredon Research Institute stressed the increasing importance of evidence-based control.

“Wherever possible, we must look to reduce infection risk and break the lifecycle of the worms without overly relying on wormers,”explained Professor Matthews.

“Best practice control should include the following; strategic treatments, targeted (diagnostic test led) treatments, annual tests for wormer resistance, good pasture hygiene such as poo picking and implementing appropriate quarantine procedures for new horses.”

Equitape is the only licenced product for horses containing praziquantel as a single active ingredient. From October 2018, it will only be available in ‘combination wormers’ also containing either ivermectin or moxidectin, the drugs most commonly used to treat small and large redworm.

The researchers state that regular testing should be the focus of any programme to find out if worming treatment is needed to minimise exposure. Worm egg counts should be carried out every two to three months and tapeworm tests every six months, the press release adds.

Consultant vet to Westgate Labs, Carolyn Cummins commented: “With reduced specificity of treatment options, we are concerned that the temptation could be to treat more and test less. However with resistance rising, the only way of identifying problems is by testing routinely, together with resistance testing, to build up a picture of what’s going on.

“Giving a wormer without understanding the worm burden present or without being aware of the efficacy of the wormer you’re using is a false economy for your horse’s health.”

Image (C) Westgate Laboratories

 

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Report: A third of Welsh birds are in decline

News Story 1
 A report by RSPB Cymru and partnering ornithology organisations has revealed that a third of bird species in Wales are in significant decline.

90 per cent of Wales is farmed and there is now pressure to implement new land management policies that will aid in nature restoration.

Patrick Lindley, Maritime Ornithologist for Natural Resources Wales, commented: “The problems that confront UK birds, whether they are breeding or non-breeding, are pressure and threats that confront entire ecosystems.

“Birds are a great indicator to the health of our environment. The continued population declines of birds of farmed, woodland and upland habitats suggest there are large geographic themes that are having a detrimental impact.”  

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News Shorts
British sheep meat to be exported to India in new agreement

The UK government has secured a new export deal of sheep meat to India.

In 2017, UK sheep meat exports were worth £386 million. This new agreement is predicted to increase this value by £6 million over the next five years.

With a range of meat cuts due to be exported, the deal is seen by international trade secretary, Dr Liam Fox MP, as “another vote of confidence in our world-leading food and drink”.