Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

What makes a good consultation?
It is vital to remember that you are not the only expert and your client might be very knowledgeable about their pet’s condition.
Louise Corah presents feedback from owners at CX Congress

“An extension of the consult is the experience you get in reception as well”.

That was one of the key messages presented by PhD student Louise Corah at Cx Congress (16 June) on what makes a good veterinary consultation. During her presentation, Louise presented feedback from owners, explained why that feedback matters, and offered her ‘top tips for a top consult’.

Louise’s research shows that the veterinary practice is no longer the only place clients can get information about their pet. Family and friends, ‘Dr Google’, books, social media, personal experience and research articles all play a part in shaping our client’s knowledge. But this doesn’t mean that they don’t care about what the vet has to say. It just means that the vet’s opinion is part of a much wider circle.

What matters most?

So what matters to the veterinary client? Louise explained that clients like to be made to feel welcome. So, even if your customer care team are on the phone when they arrive, a smile and an acknowledgement of the client's presence can make a world of difference.

Clients also want to feel like you know or care about them, she said. So if it is the first time the client is visiting the practice, be enthusiastic and try to build up some rapport. If they are a regular client, they value people making a fuss over their pet and acknowledging they might be feeling unwell.

Cleanliness also matters to clients. If your practice looks shabby, it looks dirty or it smells, people will pick up on that, said Louise. Veterinary staff that smell like cigarettes or have scrubs covered in stains do not appear very professional.

When in the waiting room, it’s the little things that make a big difference. If the vet is running behind, communicate with the waiting client about why there is a delay and offer them a cup of tea or the opportunity to re-schedule. You don’t need to include the gory details, said Louise, but an acknowledgement that you value their time makes all the difference.

During the consultation, listen to the client and hear what they are saying. It is vital to remember that you are not the only expert and your client might be very knowledgeable about their pet’s condition.

Louise’s top tips for a top consult

    •    listen
    •    be open minded
    •    show that you care
    •    remember that you’re not the only expert
    •    be human
    •    you’re all on the same team.

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Nominations for 2019 RSPCA Honours Awards now open

News Story 1
 People across the UK are being urged to nominate a standout animal champion for the 2019 RSPCA Honours Awards.

The awards recognise those who have worked tirelessly to improve animal welfare, campaigned on behalf of animals, or shown true bravery. Previous winners include comedian John Bishop, who was awarded Celebrity Animal Champion of the Year, and 11-year-old Lobby Cantwell, who raised more than £1,000 for the charity through mountain climbs and bike rides.

To submit a nomination or find out more about the awards visit the RSPCA website. Nominations will remain open until 4 pm on Friday, March 15.  

Click here for more...
News Shorts
New £1m project to investigate dairy cow lameness

Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC) is leading a new £1 million research project to investigate the causes of lameness in dairy cows.

One in three dairy cows are affected by lameness every day in the UK, costing the industry an estimated £250 milion annually.

The project will take three years to complete and is due to finish by November 2021.

Professor Georgios Banos of SRUC commented: “In addition to pain and discomfort to the animal, lameness is associated with decreased milk production and inflated farm costs.

“Among cows raised in the same environment, some become lame while others do not. Understanding the reasons behind this will help us develop targeted preventive practices contributing to enhanced animal welfare and farm profitability.”